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Hang on Oregonians

  1. Feb 4, 2006 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    Here we go. They are talking about 65 mph winds in portland, and I think up to 90 on the coast.

    I had better see if my generator still works. :uhh:
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2006
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 4, 2006 #2

    Moonbear

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    Just get back to the house before it starts...we don't need you trapped in your office all night again because you're fearing that whomping willow, or whatever that tree is that tries to kill you in storms. :rolleyes:
     
  4. Feb 4, 2006 #3

    Ivan Seeking

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    :rofl: Its not just the one tree, its the other hundred or so. But I have the car down here tonight.

    We have a 5KW Honda generator that, as near as Tsu and I can recall, hasn't been started in at least five, and probably seven years. I could hardly believe it. After a little prep and clean up - drained the old fuel, check oil etc - it started on the first pull. :surprised
     
  5. Feb 4, 2006 #4

    Pengwuino

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    How loud is the generator?
     
  6. Feb 4, 2006 #5

    Ivan Seeking

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    About like a lawn mower I guess. Why?
     
  7. Feb 4, 2006 #6

    Pengwuino

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    Seems kinda loud for something you actually need to have running next to a house.
     
  8. Feb 4, 2006 #7

    Ivan Seeking

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    We have an area that is somewhat sound insulated by three large rock walls, but for exteded periods we could run it down in my office storage area, which is over 300 feet away and enclosed on three sides.

    Have you ever gone without power for a day or two? The noise doesn't really matter much when you want coffee!
     
  9. Feb 4, 2006 #8

    Pengwuino

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    Yah ive gone a few days without power but damn... a lawnmover 24/7? screw that :P
     
  10. Feb 4, 2006 #9

    Ivan Seeking

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    No doubt, if it was going to last long the gen would get moved to the office. But it sure is nice to have when you need it. We did need it once for a couple of days.
     
  11. Feb 4, 2006 #10

    Ivan Seeking

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    ...and out here, when you don't have electric, you don't have water or, by consequence, a toilet.
     
  12. Feb 4, 2006 #11
    In The Big Chill one of the characters said the great thing about the country was that the whole outdoors was one great big toilet.
     
  13. Feb 4, 2006 #12
    Really? Why?
     
  14. Feb 4, 2006 #13

    turbo

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    People like us have wells, with electric pumps to bring up the water. No power, no water. I also have a Honda generator for just that reason (that and keeping the freezer and fridge running). We had an ice storm in the dead of winter a number of years ago that knocked out power for weeks in some areas. It gets really cold here in Maine in February. There were millions of trees down or damaged, thousands of which took out adjacent power lines. My nephew visited with a generator a few times, so we could run the furnace for a few hours and keep the house from freezing up. Soon after that, I bought my own.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2006
  15. Feb 4, 2006 #14

    Tsu

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    We also have a woodstove for those power outages. Keeps the house REAL warm - and you can cook on it!! :wink: :smile:
     
  16. Feb 4, 2006 #15

    Janus

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    Well, you have a creek, so you have the oldest form of running water there is; Run and get it.
     
  17. Feb 4, 2006 #16

    Ivan Seeking

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    What amazes me is all the objections to having a generator!!!

    City folks, eh, Turbo-1?. :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

    Do you want me to plow the fields using a horse as well? :biggrin:
     
  18. Feb 4, 2006 #17

    Ivan Seeking

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    Btw turbo-1 and interested generator users, :biggrin:, when I bought mine, the guy at the shop suggested that I kill the engine with the fuel valve rather than the off switch. That way all of the gas gets sucked out of the carb and lines before it dies. I think this made all the difference.

    Oh, this is cool. My truck has three gas tanks. So I keep them all full which gives us a 50 gallon reserve.

    Janus, how did you make out? I guess W Linn was hit pretty hard.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2006
  19. Feb 4, 2006 #18

    Moonbear

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    I'm not sure I understand the objections to the generator either. It's not like you sleep on top of it. When the alternative is several days without heat and running water, it hardly seems like all that big of a deal. And if it really bothered you, you could probably bundle up well and kill it at night when you don't really want to be tending to it anyway.

    At the one farm I worked at, we had a generator that ran off a coupling to a tractor engine. Had to use it only once when we had a thunderstorm come through and knock out power smack dab in the middle of an experiment that couldn't be stopped. Everyone got lessons on how to start it up, but we all decided afterward that we'd much rather just keep a cell phone with us and call the farm manager to do it if it was needed, mostly because we were paranoid we'd forget the all-important BIG SWITCH that kept the power from feeding back to the main lines. :surprised It was mostly there as backup for the freezers in case of any long-term power outages (we had a few decades worth of experimental samples stored in the freezers there), and for the light-controlled rooms whenever there was an experiment going on that required special light schedules.

    Janus, I love that concept of running water, "Run and get it!" :rofl: Though, after seeing pictures of Ivan's "stream" after a storm, I'm not sure anyone would want to get near that thing to get a bucket of water. :eek: Though, I guess Ivan could always install an old-fashioned hand-pump on the well. :biggrin:
     
  20. Feb 4, 2006 #19

    Ivan Seeking

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    Actually, being high in iron and various minerals, the water out of the creek is absolutely horrible; hence the elaborate well system once discussed.
     
  21. Feb 4, 2006 #20

    Moonbear

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    Polluted, or just because of all the mud and detritis that gets churned up when it's running high?

    Nevermind...you edited and I didn't notice. :rolleyes:
     
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