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Help Applying Norton and Thevin Equivalents

  • Thread starter IronBrain
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Homework Statement



I am to find the Thevin and Norton equivalents of the following circuits, my problem being I am new to these method and any help is appreciated also is there any way to simplify this circuit properly?



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Answers and Replies

  • #2
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Bump....
 
  • #3
vela
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I suppose their nothing in this circuit that can conflict with finding my solution such as a "trick"
 
  • #5
vela
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Since you say you're new to these methods, have you worked on simpler problems, like ones without a dependent source? There's generally no trick to solving these problems. You just grind them out.

The Wikipedia page on Norton's Theorem is misleading about how to find R. The page claims you have to use the method of applying a current source to the terminals when there are dependent sources present, but this method is required only when all of the sources are dependent. Your circuit has an independent source, so you can find R by calculating the open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current and finding their ratio.
 
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I think, no one here(including the moderator/administrator) can answer any problem solving related to engineering.
 

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