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B Help with light bulb radiation

  1. Feb 27, 2017 #1
    Hi guys I´m doing an experiment in thermocouples electricity generation by thermal radiation of Sun (As an addition to Solar panels). I´m still in high school and I don´t know a lot about the topic. I would like to simulate sun thermal radiation with a 100w incandescent light bulb as an independent variable and the voltage generated in a "k type" thermocouple as the dependent one. I read that tungsten filaments have black body properties approximations.
    What measurement should I take and vary if I would like to analyze Sun thermal radiation?
    How can I relate temperature at a certain distance with the wavelength, temperature, wattage and resistance of a light bulb filament?
    Would it be more convenient to use a halogen light bulb, another type of light sources or color filters? Why?
    Any help would be really appreciated and sorry if my English is not good, I´m a Spanish native speaker.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 27, 2017 #2

    anorlunda

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    :welcome:

    That sounds like very good high school experimentation. My advice is to narrow your focus. Decide what you are studying and what is excluded.

    For example, if your focus is on the thermoelectric effect, then it does not matter what he source of the thermal energy is.

    If your focus is on the energy spectrum of sunlight, it does not matter what use is made of the energy.

    Knowledge gained by such experiments can be combined with knowledge from other experiments in useful ways. But if you include to many factors in your experiment, it becomes less general and less useful.

    Your experiment should try to learn the properties of things, not to design a practical electric energy generator.

    So please think of your focus and post here again.
     
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