High dielectric strength, vacuum compatible glue

In summary, the glue that is required to bond PTFE or Hostaphan to the vacuum chamber wall in stainless steel will have to be vacuum compatible, and will require some sort of surface treatment to make it easier to adhere. Master Bond and 3M both make low outgassing adhesives, while the Cybergond CA 2240 may be a better option if dielectrict strength is a priority.
  • #1
1Keenan
101
4
Hi all,

I would need an high dielectric strenght glue to fix PTFE or Hostaphan to the vacuum chamber wall in stainless steel, so the glue should be vacuum compatible.
Force against the bonding direction would be 50N, so if the glue has already 100N it would be good but I don't think it is an issue.

Any suggestion_

THank you
 
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  • #3
jrmichler said:
Bonding PTFE is not easy, it will require some sort of surface treatment first. A quick search using terms loctite adhesive vacuum found the following: https://www.idealvac.com/files/brochures/Loctite1CHysol_TechSheet.pdf. Master Bond and 3M also make low outgassing adhesives.

And here is a good article about adhesives for vacuum environments: https://www.machinedesign.com/fasteners/epoxies-and-adhesives-fit-space .
As in the above reply, Hysol 1C is a good adhesive for vacuum, and is very similar in its properties to Torrseal.
NASA also has a database which gives the outgassing properties of many different epoxies.
 
  • #4
I have had good success with Torrseal, but I don't know if it will adhere to PTFE.
 
  • #5
Thank you for the replies.
Well, vacuum compatibility is one property I need, but I also need high dielectrict strength.
I found a product form MasterBond with very high breakdown but I cannot find it anymore...
 
  • #6
1Keenan said:
Thank you for the replies.
Well, vacuum compatibility is one property I need, but I also need high dielectrict strength.
I found a product form MasterBond with very high breakdown but I cannot find it anymore...
MasterBond is expensive, and in my experience, doesn't live up to the hype.

Cyberbond has a CA called 2240, that I often use. Works great on PTFE.

Another one I would try is Permabond ET538. It's a 2 part epoxy and it's extremely strong. we use it to adhere ceramic and PCB to steel.
 
  • #7
I was checking Permabond web site. They have specific products for PTFE, but they do not specify dielectrict strenght.
Sent an email

Cheers
F.
 
  • #8
1Keenan said:
I was checking Permabond web site. They have specific products for PTFE, but they do not specify dielectrict strenght.
Sent an email

Cheers
F.
The ET538 that i use has a Dielectric Strength 15-25 kV / mm
 
  • #9
that would be good!
 

Related to High dielectric strength, vacuum compatible glue

1. What is high dielectric strength?

High dielectric strength refers to the ability of a material to withstand high electric fields without breaking down or losing its insulating properties.

2. What makes a glue vacuum compatible?

A vacuum compatible glue is one that can maintain its strength and adhesion in a low-pressure environment, such as a vacuum chamber. This typically requires the glue to have low outgassing and minimal moisture absorption.

3. What are the benefits of using high dielectric strength, vacuum compatible glue?

Using this type of glue allows for reliable bonding in high voltage and low-pressure environments, making it ideal for applications such as electronics, aerospace, and vacuum systems. It also reduces the risk of electrical breakdown and improves overall performance.

4. What materials are typically used to create high dielectric strength, vacuum compatible glue?

Silicone and epoxy are commonly used materials for creating high dielectric strength, vacuum compatible glue. These materials have low outgassing and can withstand high electric fields and low-pressure environments.

5. Can high dielectric strength, vacuum compatible glue be used for outdoor applications?

It depends on the specific glue and its intended use. Some high dielectric strength, vacuum compatible glue can also have weather-resistant properties, making them suitable for outdoor applications. However, it is always best to check the product specifications to ensure its suitability for your specific needs.

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