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Medical His sex life

  1. Dec 31, 2007 #1
    I have married for a year, and I am sick, so my husband has to use a condom when having sex with me. But after he ejaculates and withdraws his penis out of the condom, his penis becomes really itchy and red. He is from America and he is fully circumsized.
    He actually was advised to visit a doctor already but the result was negative. Although I think it is fine to continue like this but as a wife I think I should help learn something about this too.

    Could anyone tell me about this strange problem of post-ejaculation ?
    Thanks
    Joang
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 31, 2007 #2
    Try using a non latex condom, sounds like a slight allergy, which is fairly common.
     
  4. Dec 31, 2007 #3
    thanks I know it now
     
  5. Jan 11, 2008 #4
    Be careful though because depending on why you use condoms, non-latex ones like sheeps skin do not fully protect the wearer. If your illness is transmitted sexually, animal skin condoms do not protect.
     
  6. Jan 12, 2008 #5

    Moonbear

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    Along those lines, the other alternative to latex are polyurethane condoms. They do protect against the same diseases as latex condoms, but you should be aware they tend to slip off a lot more easily, so care must be taken that they stay on...if it comes off, it's not protecting anyone from anything, obviously.
     
  7. Jan 12, 2008 #6

    Danger

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    Yeah... those polyurethane things are very unsettling.
    When my local drug store didn't have them, and the girl that I was hanging out with was allergic to latex, my pharmacist suggested wearing a latex condom inside of a sheepskin one. That would give protection from both STD's and her latex allergy. Unfortunately, her sudden realization that I was a fair bit older than her mother precluded the opportunity to test that out. :redface:
     
  8. Jan 14, 2008 #7

    Moonbear

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    Okay, folks, let's stay on topic with this thread (a bunch of off-topic conversation has been deleted).

    There is a method I'm aware of that can help secure the polyurethane condoms in place better than they stay on their own, but am hesitant about mentioning/discussing that particular approach on the public forum because it requires an "accessory" that isn't traditionally considered for use as a contraceptive aid, and I don't want to attract all the spammers who would pick up on that as a keyword. For anyone in need of legitimate suggestions, I can certainly provide that information via Private Message.
     
  9. Jan 14, 2008 #8

    Evo

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    I think a wise preventative are the condoms that include a spermacide, so even if it slips off, there is less to worry about.
     
  10. Jan 15, 2008 #9

    Moonbear

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    The spermicide on condoms isn't really adequate if they slip off. It's really more useful for the one or two "strays" that might have wound up on the wrong side of the condom by improper application or waiting too long to put it on. The reason that it's not adequate is that 1) it's really very little spermicide, and 2) spermicide needs time to coat the cervix to be in the right place to be effective if used as a primary contraceptive (i.e., when the condom falls off and there's no other barrier). And, of course it has absolutely no function in disease prevention.

    For those who use a spermicidal jelly as a contraceptive, it should be applied 15 min to a half hour in advance to sufficiently coat the cervix and be maximally effective (take time to read the package instructions BEFORE you need it). Applying it just before intercourse is not going to be fully effective. It's a good back-up if used appropriately, just don't rely on the spermicide on the condoms themselves.
     
  11. Jan 15, 2008 #10

    Evo

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    Good to know, I thought the spermacide in the condom helped kill the sperm inside the condom.
     
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