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How can I stop condensation (not fog) build-up on my goggles?

  1. Feb 9, 2018 #1
    I have uvex stealth anti-fog chemistry goggles, and in lab the lenses build up with dew. It becomes so bad that I can't see and I have to regularly exit the lab every 15 minutes to wipe them off. I sweat when in the lab, so I'm not sure if that's why . There's no fog, just pure dew drop condensation. My professor just recommended buying another pair of goggles and switching back and forth the whole lab, which seems ridiculous to me. Anyone else have this problem? How can I fix this?
    Thanks!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 9, 2018 #2
    A snorkeler's trick is to apply a very thin film of dish soap on the inside of the goggles. (I see now not fog, but could still help)

    That must be the main contribution. Maybe wear less layers in the lab?
     
  4. Feb 9, 2018 #3

    berkeman

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    Maybe try wearing a sweatband around your forehead? If you can get it to work with your goggles, that could keep condensation from forming. Also, have you tried wearing the new synthetic workout shirts? They are *much* cooler than regular cotton T-shirts...

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0780/7873/products/TyRS-21b.jpg?v=1468778312
    TyRS-21b.jpg
     
  5. Feb 9, 2018 #4
    If it's sweat I've got no idea, but if it's residual condensation then try rinsing them with acetone
     
  6. Feb 9, 2018 #5

    Tom.G

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    Three tricks that help:
    Keep the surface super clean to eliminate nucleation sites. Acetone wipe sounds good but dissolves many plastics. Also try Vinegar, Ammonia, bleach, or alcohol.
    Rub surface with a freshly cut raw potatoe.
    Spread saliva on the surface.

    [EDIT] I've heard of commercially available hydrophobic treatments/solutions but don't recall any details.
     
  7. Feb 10, 2018 #6

    Borek

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    I would consult scuba divers.
     
  8. Feb 10, 2018 #7

    berkeman

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    If that headband is too bulky and keeps your goggles from sealing well, maybe look into the thinner-style "dew rags"...
    As Greg said, we use dish soap. Just be sure to rinse well before putting your mask on. You only under-rinse on one dive...

    But in general, when diving, sweating into your mask isn't an issue. :smile:
     
  9. Feb 10, 2018 #8

    CWatters

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  10. Feb 10, 2018 #9

    berkeman

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  11. Feb 10, 2018 #10

    DaveC426913

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    Have you tried the simple spit trick?
    Spit on the inside of the lenses. Rub it around the whole surface. Rinse lightly with water.

    Your spit should lower the surface tension, which should make for less obvious dewdrops, as well as reduce nucleation.
     
  12. Feb 10, 2018 #11

    Borek

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    Well, I count myself as a scuba diver as well (just an OWD). I know of soap, I know of spitting, but they are great in water, not necessarily when working with a dry goggles. What I meant was that those diving in dry suits can have some more ideas.

    Years ago I had a skiing mask with a special antifog coating on the internal side. Wouldn't be practical in the lab though.
     
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