How can molecules be designed to respond to radio signals?

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In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of designing a molecule that can rearrange in response to electromagnetic signals and then return to its original structure when the signal stops. However, this idea faces challenges due to the large wavelengths involved and thermal fluctuations at conventional temperatures. Some researchers have suggested that similar mechanisms may already exist in nature, such as in the temperature-sensitive sensory components of organisms. However, this has not been proven conclusively.
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arman4
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Hi everyone,

I'm wondering if its possible to design a molecule that re-arrange on an electromagnetic (non-visible and radio) signal, and revert back to original structure when signal stops.

Thanks in advance
 
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Two problems with this.
Firstly you're talking about wavelengths orders of magnitude larger than typical molecules and even whole biological cells.

Secondly at these lower frequencies you are near or below the peak freq. for thermal spectrum at conventional temperatures so unless the molecule is cooled down near single digit Kelvin temperatures, the background thermal fluctuations will randomize any arrangements you're considering.

Likely what is possible has been evolved in nature. (... pause for google searches...)

Consider the temperature sensitive sensory components of many organisms. Your sense of tactile warmth and more selectively a pit viper's heat "vision" must involve protein reconfigurations at the sensor cells. However this is not a direct effect but rather the infrared produces heat which is sensed. [See:http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v464/n7291/abs/nature08943.html" ]

Phillip S. Callahan suggested moths may detect pheromones from their infrared "colors" but this has pretty much been discounted by the very argument I gave with regard to thermal equilibrium issues. [see: http://www.jstor.org/pss/76364"]
 
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1. What is a radio-sensitive molecule?

A radio-sensitive molecule is a type of molecule that can be affected or damaged by exposure to ionizing radiation, such as X-rays, gamma rays, or radioactive particles. It is important to study these molecules because they play a crucial role in many biological processes and can impact human health.

2. How is a radio-sensitive molecule different from a regular molecule?

A radio-sensitive molecule is different from a regular molecule because it has the ability to absorb and interact with ionizing radiation, which can cause changes in its structure and function. Regular molecules do not have this ability and are not affected by radiation.

3. What are the potential effects of radiation on a radio-sensitive molecule?

The potential effects of radiation on a radio-sensitive molecule can vary depending on the type and intensity of the radiation. It can cause changes in the molecule's structure, alter its chemical properties, or even break it apart. These effects can lead to disruptions in biological processes and potentially harmful consequences for living organisms.

4. How do scientists study radio-sensitive molecules?

Scientists use various techniques to study radio-sensitive molecules, including spectroscopy, crystallography, and biochemical assays. These methods allow them to analyze the structure, function, and behavior of these molecules before and after exposure to radiation, providing valuable insights into their properties and potential effects.

5. Why is it important to understand radio-sensitive molecules?

Understanding radio-sensitive molecules is crucial for many fields of science, including medicine, radiation biology, and environmental health. It can help us develop new treatments for diseases, improve radiation safety standards, and mitigate the impacts of radiation on living organisms and the environment.

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