How do batteries give the electrons their energy?

  • #1
sodium.dioxid
51
0
When a coulomb (of electron) flows through a resistor, it loses the energy it gained in the battery. How were these electrons fueled in the battery in the first place? I already know that chemical reactions rearrange electrons in the battery. But this doesn't directly address the energy gain (voltage) in the battery.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
pallidin
2,209
2
In a battery, chemical reactions provide for an electrical "potential difference" of the electrodes.
If you are confused, remember that these types of reactions are not perpetually sustainable in a 'closed' system.
They work for a while, then not.
 
  • #3
Dale
Mentor
Insights Author
2021 Award
33,225
10,605
Hi sodium.dioxid, welcome to PF

Remember that energy is the capacity to do work and that work is f.d, so fundamentally a battery works by giving a small f over a microscopic d that literally pushes on the electron. That is where the energy comes from, that microscopic push.
 
  • #5
sodium.dioxid
51
0
Sorry guys, I meant to say electric device rather than resistor. Anyway, so they gain chemical energy? But what is that and how do the electrons react to it once they get it.
 
  • #6
Dale
Mentor
Insights Author
2021 Award
33,225
10,605
Anyway, so they gain chemical energy? But what is that
A microscopic push, as I already mentioned.

and how do the electrons react to it once they get it.
They push their neighboring electrons.
 

Suggested for: How do batteries give the electrons their energy?

Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
522
Replies
7
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
14
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
18
Views
2K
Replies
20
Views
25K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
874
Replies
2
Views
2K
Replies
6
Views
2K
Top