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How do batteries give the electrons their energy?

  1. Apr 4, 2010 #1
    When a coulomb (of electron) flows through a resistor, it loses the energy it gained in the battery. How were these electrons fueled in the battery in the first place? I already know that chemical reactions rearrange electrons in the battery. But this doesn't directly address the energy gain (voltage) in the battery.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 5, 2010 #2
    In a battery, chemical reactions provide for an electrical "potential difference" of the electrodes.
    If you are confused, remember that these types of reactions are not perpetually sustainable in a 'closed' system.
    They work for a while, then not.
     
  4. Apr 5, 2010 #3

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    Hi sodium.dioxid, welcome to PF

    Remember that energy is the capacity to do work and that work is f.d, so fundamentally a battery works by giving a small f over a microscopic d that literally pushes on the electron. That is where the energy comes from, that microscopic push.
     
  5. Apr 5, 2010 #4
  6. Apr 5, 2010 #5
    Sorry guys, I meant to say electric device rather than resistor. Anyway, so they gain chemical energy? But what is that and how do the electrons react to it once they get it.
     
  7. Apr 5, 2010 #6

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    A microscopic push, as I already mentioned.

    They push their neighboring electrons.
     
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