How do I solve AP chemical equations without memorization?

In summary, the conversation is about reviewing AP chemical equations and figuring out the products given the reactants. The person is looking for a general explanation on how to solve these types of questions and mentions that memorizing every single reaction is not feasible. They also mention the possibility of finding rules on a website but have not been successful. The expert recommends knowing a few basic reactions and suggests using a recommended reading list or general chemistry textbooks to gain a better understanding. They also mention that on the AP exam, students will have to complete a set number of chemical equations.
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I am reviewing AP chemical equations in class and we have to figure out the products given the reactants. I don't want to post every single question so could someone explain how to these types of questions in general:

potassuium permanganate solution is added to oxalic acid and acidified with a few drops of sulfuric acid

magnesim turnings are added to aqueous ferric chloride

solid zinc hyrdoxide is treated with concentrated sodium solution.

Note;
The products in each question are very different so I can't just memorize every single chemical reaction. Maybe there is a website with rules for stuff like this, but I can't find any.
 
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  • #2
Originally posted by JKLM
I am reviewing AP chemical equations in class and we have to figure out the products given the reactants. I don't want to post every single question so could someone explain how to these types of questions in general:

potassuium permanganate solution is added to oxalic acid and acidified with a few drops of sulfuric acid

magnesim turnings are added to aqueous ferric chloride

solid zinc hyrdoxide is treated with concentrated sodium solution.

Note;
The products in each question are very different so I can't just memorize every single chemical reaction.


There might be a better way --- t'ain't been found yet, to my knowledge --- if you haven't the time to "memorize" a few basics, you're going to go through hell learning chemistry.
Maybe there is a website with rules for stuff like this, but I can't find any.

There are only seven (6? or 8?) reactions you have to know as a chemist, substitutions, eliminations, and free radicals --- see Jerry March, Advanced Organic Chemistry for the details --- these reactions are not restricted to organic chemistry, but cover anything you'll ever run into. There's a hitch --- you've got to know some chemistry before any of it will make any sense to you --- you have to have been handed a "recommended" reading list at the beginning of your course --- use it. Failing the reading list, hit the school library and pick one or two of the general chem texts from the pre-AP days and start digging.
 
  • #3
And to add to that, on the AP exam you'll get a big list of chemical equations, and you'll have to pick out several of them (a dozen, I think) and complete them.

It's not fun. =P
 

What are AP chemical equations?

AP chemical equations refer to the chemical equations used in Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry courses. They are used to represent the reactions between different substances in a concise and standardized form.

What is the purpose of AP chemical equations?

The main purpose of AP chemical equations is to help students understand and predict the outcome of chemical reactions. They also help to communicate and record the results of experiments in a clear and organized manner.

How are AP chemical equations written?

AP chemical equations follow a specific format, with the reactants on the left side of the arrow and the products on the right side. The reactants and products are separated by an arrow, with any additional information such as physical states or the direction of the reaction written above or below the arrow.

What are coefficients and subscripts in AP chemical equations?

Coefficients are numbers written in front of a chemical formula to indicate the number of molecules or moles involved in the reaction. Subscripts, on the other hand, are numbers written below and to the right of an element's symbol to indicate the number of atoms present in a molecule.

What are the rules for balancing AP chemical equations?

The following are general rules for balancing AP chemical equations:
1. The number of atoms of each element must be the same on both sides of the equation.
2. Only coefficients, not subscripts, can be changed to balance the equation.
3. Start by balancing the most complex or unique molecule first.
4. Balance elements that appear only once on each side of the equation first.
5. Check to make sure all atoms are balanced after making any changes.

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