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How to create microscope videos?

  1. Feb 10, 2016 #1
    Hello, I don't have a microscope yet, but I want to buy one, sometime in the future.
    I was wondering if anyone can teach me or recommend me some good resources for learning how to make microscope videos.

    I would like to compare the difference between cooking oil and cold press cooking oil for example - for me it would be an awesome thing.
    But that's the first thing that comes into my mind, I think many similar comparisons can be made.

    And can you recommend me some good microscopes? Some capable to show cells and even bacteria, if possible.

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 12, 2016 #2

    Fervent Freyja

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    It will be difficult to view oil under a light microscope- it will be almost as transparent as the slide. You can cause excitation in the oil to view pockets of air and record that behavior or observe the impurities, but otherwise...

    For using video, I suggest a trinocular compound microscope. This might do:

    http://www.amscope.com/compound-mic...e-with-3-d-double-layer-mechanical-stage.html

    This company has an agreement with suppliers Zeiss, Leica, Nikon, and Olympus, so you may be able to get some higher quality parts than from a store in your area. Great for what you want. Though, it likely won’t come precisely aligned (many people don’t seem to notice that) but it doesn’t take much if you notice those things. Learn how to take it apart and clean it correctly before you even begin to use it.

    For the camera, you are better off buying a Nikon with some adapters and a calibrating kit. BioImageXD offers some free imaging software, along with Amscope, and others. You can perform measurements/tracking/layering.

    If you are crafty you can build some polarizers and darkfield patch stops (print on acetate, you can determine the scattering angles more precisely). If you want to experiment further with oils, then you can experiment with more filters (see Rhienberg filters too), stains, lighting, heat, and such.

    If you are interested in observing the motility of critters, I suggest using darkfield. If you want to slow their movement before they begin to die, then increase the viscosity of the medium or introduce a chemical to intoxicate them (like eye drops). That was the first thing I wanted to do with my first almost ten years ago (my Husband didn’t mind at all).

    As for resources, there are very little worth bothering with. If you have kids, hide any valuable objectives that they might get their hands on.
     
  4. Feb 12, 2016 #3

    Andy Resnick

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    I think you'll find plenty of good resources here at PF, actually.

    I don't understand what you mean- what differences, exactly?

    What is your level of experience, and how much do you want to spend?
     
  5. Feb 14, 2016 #4
    Thanks a lot for the answers!
    My level of experience is zero.
    I forgot to mention in the first message that I would like to take photos too, not only to make videos.
    I would like to see the difference in how those two different oils look like under the microscope, of course.
    But also I would like to put droplets of water and observe the organisms in there.

    @Fervent Freyja: how can it be that microscope to be so cheap ($270)? From what I've seen before, such microscopes can cost up to thousands of dollars.
    And what do you think about this microscope: SKU: T370B-8M ? - it comes together with an 8 megapixel camera.
    Just to have an idea, can you recommend a specific model of Nikon camera and some specific adapters that work for that camera? Also some calibration kits?
    Does AmScope or anyone else sell filters for dark field, polarized light and Rhienberg effects?

    Funny, I just noticed that actually oils are used in microscopy in order to provide better images (Oil immersion). And then how can one observe the oil itself with a microscope?
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2016
  6. Feb 14, 2016 #5

    rbelli1

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    If there are impurities suspended it it you may be able to see them. If the oils are free of debris then you will not be able to see any detail with an optical microscope.

    BoB
     
  7. Feb 14, 2016 #6

    Fervent Freyja

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    Those high quality microscopes are usually customized for particular needs and furnished by an employer or institution. That is not a bad price for a student or first hobby microscope. Even with a hobby, you are likely to end up accumulating supplies multiple times the initial cost of the microscope.

    T370B-8M is the same as T370B, you will just be paying $200 more for the camera. Placing your cell phone camera over the eyepiece would work just as well in that case. No, I cannot recommend anything specific for you until you decide a budget. You could end up making almost any camera work for this. The calibration kit is like a ruler (stage micrometer) that you use as a point of reference in order for the software to obtain measurements, last thing you really want to worry about with zero experience. The patch stops don’t filter light, they block it. All of this depends on the microscope you are using. It's often easier to just make things yourself(unless someone else is going to supply it), I use my scrapbooking punches to make some filters.

    You cannot observe the oil itself directly. You didn't answer his question, why/what differences do you want to observe? I assumed you wanted to view your semen/sperm. Apparently not. Something related to nuclear weapons?
     
  8. Feb 15, 2016 #7

    Andy Resnick

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    For someone with your experience, I recommend a Digital Blue microscope, because they are the easiest to use and will let you learn about the different components (stage, condenser, stops, etc) and various technical aspects of microscopy (stability, empty magnification, sample prep, etc) very inexpensively. Don't think they are only a kid's toy. Depending on how fast you learn, you will likely outgrow this scope sometime between a few months or a year and then be ready, if you are so inclined, to move on to a more advanced 'scope that offers improved performance and better control over the various components. I tried out a QX3 when it came out and was very impressed by what it could do. Newer models should work even better- better lighting and better camera.
     
  9. Feb 15, 2016 #8

    Andy Resnick

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    Possibly, but if you don't know what you are doing you'll just end up wasting money. Most filters are associated with specific objective lenses, require careful alignment, and thus are manufacturer-specific.

    I don't know any commercial supplier of Rheinberg illumination filters- those are strictly DIY. I've long wanted to make some, the effect is quite striking!
     
  10. Feb 15, 2016 #9

    rbelli1

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    I've seen photos using this technique and always thought that some sort of post processing (Photoshop?) was done on them. It makes for some impressive pictures. Is this type of filter useful other than aesthetically?

    BoB
     
  11. Feb 15, 2016 #10

    Andy Resnick

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    Definitely not photoshop:

    http://www.nikonsmallworld.com/techniques/main/rheinberg-illumination

    Whether or not it's 'useful' is a reasonable question- I guess it depends on what you consider useful. There's a whole class of optical staining techniques that are used to measure the refractive index (or indices, if the material is birefringent), I suppose Rheinberg is a form of optical staining as well, but it stains based on spatial frequencies.

    https://www.mccrone.com/mm/rheinber...pproach-to-high-magnification-color-contrast/
     
  12. Feb 24, 2016 #11
    Viewing sperm? Bleah!
    Even if I wouldn't find it disgusting, I could not do it, because I'm against ejaculation.
    The sexual energy is supposed to be sublimated and raised from muladhara chakra to sahasrara (crown chakra), not being wasted through ejaculation.
    After ejaculation (most of the time occurring after just a few minutes of sex), men suddenly fall asleep. While those who awaken their Kundalini energy can have sex for hours and feel full of energy after that.
    It's worth to live to see the difference :)

    And sorry for answering so late, somehow I forgot about this conversation.
     
  13. Feb 24, 2016 #12

    Fervent Freyja

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    From the 1940 Edition "How to Attain and Practice the Ideal Sex Life", a translated by Norman Haire from "Das Sexualleleben in seiner biologischen Bedeutung" by Dr. J. Rodgers. It took me a while to find it, I thought it had been funny... "Sexual abstinence may really lead to the most serious neuroses and to complete insanity. The casual nexus may be distinctly traced through a certain parallelism in related cases."

    A shortcut here is to let your lover fall asleep then wake them up a few hours later.

    Anyway, this is off topic of the original post and I don't need to keep getting into trouble... If you want to continue discussing the topic then you can post another question.

    I can say that wanting to view sperm under a microscope is a common curiosity regardless of gender and age. I don't think it is disturbing, and people tend to be drawn to disturbing and gross things regardless(then pretend not to be). They are adorable little critters and I've always felt bad when they die in front of my eyes.
     
  14. Feb 24, 2016 #13

    Fervent Freyja

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    When you make them I would like to see how you've put them together. Mine have always turned out ugly because of the adhesives.

    Keeping the center stop(s) the microscope uses from dark field and just using filters around it seems to be most striking for me.

    On another note: What do you think about using something like this in materials used for dark field microscopy and other techniques? What improvements in imaging quality could there be?

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencet...-material-using-microscopic-rods-spheres.html
     
  15. Feb 24, 2016 #14
    :olduhh:

    Jack Ripper actually has a similar theory to this..Fast forward to 1:00



    If you have the time, here's some further wisdom from Jack:

     
  16. Feb 25, 2016 #15

    Andy Resnick

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    Will do - I was thinking about using simple gels and punches but I haven't gotten to considering the adhesive... good to know! What have you used?

    I don't know about phase contrast rings- I do know Zeiss uses soot rings, so this may be a possible (and rather costly) alternative. In general, I see this being useful for stray light control- edges of lenses, inner baffling, etc.
     
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