How to deal with very active component?

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In summary, the conversation discusses using a horizontal furnace for reducing lanthanum nickel oxide, but the sample is at risk of oxidation when taken out of the furnace. The suggested solutions include using a vacuum or inert gas such as argon, or purging the furnace with argon and using a Ti-getter to react with any remaining oxygen. The conversation also mentions the use of a cool zone or side chamber for cooling the sample out of air.
  • #1
nakamura25
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Hi there!

I used a horizontal furnace under hydrogen (reductive gas) and nitrogen (protective gas) to reduce some kind of lanthanum nickel oxide. After reduction and air-cooling, I took the sample out of the furnace. The sample started to flame and been oxidized. There was no time to move the sample into glove box or somewhere to protect from oxygen.

Are there any ways to protect my sample from expose to air?
And ways for storage?

Thanks a million!
 
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  • #2
One would have to do it in a vacuum, or protective inert gas such as argon.

Either one purges the furnace with Argon and let it cool to room temp, or one needs a side chamber filled with Ar to allow the specimen to cool out of air.

Most furnaces that must be online continuously have a cool zone to allow the charge to cool. I've seen vacuum furnaces and reduction furnaces (cracked ammonia). I have also see furnaces with Ar atmosphere, but they must be purged with Ar to drive out the air. Usually a Ti-getter is placed in the furnace to react with any oxygen remaining.
 

1. How can I manage the energy levels of a very active component?

One way to manage the energy levels of a very active component is to provide it with a consistent and appropriate source of energy. This can be achieved through a well-designed power supply or battery system. Additionally, using energy-saving techniques such as sleep modes or clock gating can help conserve energy when the component is not in use.

2. What factors should I consider when designing a cooling system for a highly active component?

Some important factors to consider when designing a cooling system for a highly active component include the power dissipation of the component, the ambient temperature, and the airflow within the system. It is also important to ensure that the cooling system is able to maintain a safe operating temperature for the component.

3. How can I prevent overheating in a very active component?

To prevent overheating in a very active component, it is essential to have a well-designed and efficient cooling system in place. This can include heat sinks, fans, and other cooling mechanisms. It is also important to ensure that the component is not operating above its recommended temperature range, and to monitor its temperature regularly.

4. What are some common techniques for reducing the power consumption of a highly active component?

Some common techniques for reducing power consumption in a highly active component include using low-power modes when the component is not in use, optimizing the clock frequency, and implementing power-saving algorithms. Additionally, using energy-efficient components and minimizing parasitic power losses can also help reduce power consumption.

5. How can I ensure the reliability and longevity of a very active component?

To ensure the reliability and longevity of a very active component, it is important to carefully select and test all components used in the system. Proper thermal management and electrical protection measures should also be implemented. Regular maintenance and monitoring of the component can also help identify and address any potential issues before they become major problems.

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