How to find the voltage 'v' in the given network?

In summary: Remember, you were trying to find equivalent resistance with the 10 Volt source shorted out. That means, replace it with a conducting wire. This is one approach to obtaining the solution you want. However, you have not been able to find equivalent resistance this way.Remember, you were trying to find equivalent resistance with the 10 Volt source shorted out. That means, replace it with a conducting wire. This is one approach to obtaining the solution you want. However, you have not been able to find equivalent resistance this way.
  • #1
Bobby425
12
0

Homework Statement

Homework Equations

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The Attempt at a Solution

 
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  • #2
What have you tried?
 
  • #3
i can not able decide which is suitable to find that voltage
please explain how to find that voltage!
i am always confused while reducing the network wheather the resistors are in series or in parallel.
axmls said:
What have you tried?
i tried voltage division but getting struck with those resistors can't able to decide they are either in parallel or series
 
  • #4
Write a loop equation around the loop with an open circuit. What does that tell you about V?
 
  • #5
axmls said:
Write a loop equation around the loop with an open circuit. What does that tell you about V?
we need voltages across 3 &1ohm resistors for that! How to find those voltages?
 
  • #6
Bobby425 said:
we need voltages across 3 &1ohm resistors for that! How to find those voltages?
Don't forget the 6Ω resistor.

It's a policy at PF, not to give solutions. We are here to help you to arrive at a solution .
 
  • #7
Sir can you please elaborate the explanation on to find that v?
 
  • #8
Write the loop equation around that loop. Just write it in terms of the voltages. Notice that no current flows through the resistor on the top branch. You should get V = something. Your goal is to find out what that something is.
 
  • #9
Bobby425 said:
Sir can you please elaborate the explanation on to find that v?
Can any current flow through the 1Ω resistor in the circuit as it was presented above?
 
  • #10
SammyS said:
Can any current flow through the 1Ω resistor in the circuit as it was presented above?
no,sir as current requires closed path to flow
 
  • #11
Bobby425 said:
no,sir as current requires closed path to flow
Then you have a very simple circuit to analyze.
 
  • #12
SammyS said:
Then you have a very simple circuit to analyze.
Sir okay done i found that voltage v=10/3
now if we want to find the equvalent resistance of that network how to proceed?
i am getting confused with 1 & 3 Ohm resistors Whether they are in series or parallel?
 
  • #13
Bobby425 said:
Sir okay done i found that voltage v=10/3
now if we want to find the equivalent resistance of that network how to proceed?
i am getting confused with 1 & 3 Ohm resistors Whether they are in series or parallel?
What is the process you are to follow in finding the equivalent resistance?
 
  • #14
SammyS said:
What is the process you are to follow in finding the equivalent resistance?
Short circuiting voltage source and then to check the resistors whether in series or parallel
 
  • #15
Bobby425 said:
Short circuiting voltage source and then to check the resistors whether in series or parallel
Right.

So you must consider all three resistors. What combinations are in parallel ? What combinations are in series?
 
  • #16
SammyS said:
Right.

So you must consider all three resistors. What combinations are in parallel ? What combinations are in series?
I think 3&1 in parallel combination
this combination is in series with 6 ohm
 
  • #17
Bobby425 said:
I think 3&1 in parallel combination
this combination is in series with 6 ohm
That's not right. Does some of the current flowing through the 1Ω resistor also flow through the 3Ω resistor? Is the voltage drop across these two the same?

Draw the resulting circuit. You're finding the equivalent resistance from the + terminal to the - terminal with the voltage source shorted.

Does any pair of resistors have the same current flowing through them?
Does any pair of resistors have the same voltage drop across them?
 
  • #18
SammyS said:
That's not right. Does some of the current flowing through the 1Ω resistor also flow through the 3Ω resistor? Is the voltage drop across these two the same?

Draw the resulting circuit. You're finding the equivalent resistance from the + terminal to the - terminal with the voltage source shorted.

Does any pair of resistors have the same current flowing through them?
Does any pair of resistors have the same voltage drop across them?
Sir
total current flowing in the network is 10/9
because of this currents the voltage drops across the resistors are as follows
6 ohm is 20/3 Volts
3 ohm is 10/3 Volts
but for 1ohm ?
i can not able to conclude series and parallel combination reduction it's still confusing me!
 
  • #19
Bobby425 said:
but for 1ohm ?
You figured out that no current flows through it. What is the voltage drop at a resistor with a current of 0?
 
  • #20
Bobby425 said:
Sir
total current flowing in the network is 10/9
because of this currents the voltage drops across the resistors are as follows
6 ohm is 20/3 Volts
3 ohm is 10/3 Volts
but for 1ohm ?
i can not able to conclude series and parallel combination reduction it's still confusing me!
That is all for the case in which no current flows through the 1Ω resistor.

Remember, you were trying to find equivalent resistance with the 10 Volt source shorted out. That means, replace it with a conducting wire. This is one approach to obtaining the solution you want. However, you have not been able to find equivalent resistance this way.

You haven't actually stated what your ultimate goal way in analyzing this circuit. However, considering that you were looking for the open circuit voltage, and the above equivalent resistance, it's pretty clear that you are looking to find the Thevenin equivalent circuit.

Apparently you found some current to be 10/9 A. I should ask you how you got that and then wait for your answer, but I need to get to bed.
(It may purely be a coincidence that these currents are the same, but) 10/9 A is also the current that would flow through the terminals (also through the 1Ω resistor) of the given circuit if you short the resistor terminals. (Edited)

An alternate way to find the equivalent resistance is to find what resistance is needed with a voltage source of 10/3 V in order to have that current of 10/9 A. Can you find that resistance value?

Edited
 
Last edited:
  • #21
mfb said:
You figured out that no current flows through it. What is the voltage drop at a resistor with a current of 0?
Zero
 
  • #22
Bobby425 said:
Zero
If you're still replying to this thread ...

From the question you asked in Post #1 & #3 regarding voltage and then the combination of what you posted in #12 & #14 regarding equivalent resistance, I take it this all is part of some larger overall question.

Please give the entire statement of the problem.
 

Related to How to find the voltage 'v' in the given network?

1. How do you calculate voltage in a circuit?

Voltage (V) can be calculated by using Ohm's Law, which states that V=IR, where I is the current in the circuit and R is the resistance. Alternatively, voltage can also be calculated by using Kirchhoff's Voltage Law (KVL), which states that the sum of all voltages in a closed loop must equal zero.

2. What is the role of a voltage source in a circuit?

A voltage source is a component in a circuit that supplies the electrical energy needed for the flow of current. It creates a potential difference, or voltage, between two points in the circuit, which causes the electrons to flow from the negative terminal to the positive terminal.

3. How do you find the voltage in a parallel circuit?

In a parallel circuit, the voltage across each branch is the same. To find the voltage in a parallel circuit, you can use the formula V=IR, where I is the total current in the circuit and R is the total resistance. Alternatively, you can use KVL to find the voltage in each branch and then add them together.

4. How is voltage measured in a circuit?

Voltage is measured using a voltmeter, which is a device that is connected in parallel to the component or circuit being measured. The voltmeter measures the potential difference between two points and displays the voltage in volts (V).

5. How do you find the voltage drop across a specific component in a circuit?

To find the voltage drop across a specific component in a circuit, you can use Ohm's Law (V=IR) or Kirchhoff's Voltage Law (KVL). If the component is in a series circuit, the voltage drop will be equal to the voltage of the entire circuit. In a parallel circuit, you can use the formula V=IR, where I is the current in that specific branch and R is the resistance of the component.

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