How to make that "E" symbol for Engineering Notation?

In summary, the conversation discussed the symbol used in engineering notation, specifically the "E" used in place of "x10^". Various options were explored, including using the symbol from a list of possible symbols or formatting it with \footnotesize and \textsf. It was ultimately determined that 3{\footnotesize \textsf{E}}-10 was the desired symbol.
  • #1
ProfuselyQuarky
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I have failed to Google the answer because I don't even know what to call it. You know that little "E" used in Engineering notation that lacks serifs?

How do I make that "E"?
 
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  • #2
If it's not either of these: ##\epsilon,## ##\varepsilon##, then you might need to provide a link to something that uses the symbol you mean.
 
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  • #5
jedishrfu said:
I think she means the number notation:

3.0E−9 or 3.0e−9

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Engineering_notation
Yes, that's what I mean exactly. My textbook (as well as my calculator) notates it with a distinct little E that's thin, short and not italicized. Anyone know how to make it right off the bat? Now I shall scroll through Fresh's link...
 
  • #6
fresh_42 said:
Here's a pretty long list of possible symbols (if loaded): http://detexify.kirelabs.org/symbols.html
Your link had code for telephones and fax machines but nothing for that little "E" :frown: Perhaps there is no way to make it.
 
  • #7
How about 3{\footnotesize \textsf{E}}-10
 
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  • #8
DrClaude said:
How about 3{\footnotesize \textsf{E}}-10
Yes, it worked! Thank you! It's exactly what I was looking for!
 

1. How do I make the "E" symbol for Engineering Notation?

To make the "E" symbol for Engineering Notation, you can either use the symbol's Unicode character (U+0045) on your keyboard, or you can copy and paste the symbol from a website or document that already has it.

2. What is the purpose of the "E" symbol in Engineering Notation?

The "E" symbol in Engineering Notation represents the exponent, or the power of 10, that is used to express a number in scientific notation. It makes it easier to read and write very large or very small numbers.

3. Can I use a different symbol instead of "E" in Engineering Notation?

Yes, some sources may use a different symbol such as "×10^" or "x10^" to represent the exponent in Engineering Notation. However, the "E" symbol is the most commonly used and recognized symbol for this purpose.

4. Is there a specific font or format I should use for the "E" symbol in Engineering Notation?

No, there is no specific font or format required for the "E" symbol in Engineering Notation. It can be written in regular text or superscript, depending on personal preference or the style guide of the document or publication.

5. How do I type the "E" symbol on a mobile device?

To type the "E" symbol on a mobile device, you can use a keyboard app that includes special characters or symbols, or you can copy and paste the symbol from a website or document that already has it.

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