I tried to build a radio receiver

In summary, the conversation centered around the individual's attempts to build a radio receiver using a TS832 transmitter and a RS832 receiver. They measured the TS832's antenna and cut a copper wire to the same length. They connected the wire to a multimeter and set it to 200 milliamps, but did not get a signal. The discussion then shifted to how to build an antenna that can pick up a radio signal from the TS832, with suggestions to use a twin wire transmission line and impedance matching to achieve a 50 Ohm resistance. The individual also mentioned wanting to increase range by using a second antenna, but was advised against it due to potential legal issues.
  • #1
David lopez
257
3
i have ts832 transmitter and a rs832 receiver. i tried to build a radio receiver to pick up radio signals from the ts832 transmitter,. i measured the ts832's antenna. it was 8.8 centimeters. so i cut a piece of copper wire 8.8 centimeters long. i connected the bottom of the copper wire to two other wires. 1 wire was connected to the black prong of a multimeter. the other wire was connected to the red prong of the multimeter. i set the multimeter to 200 milliamps. i don't think i got a signal. most of the time the multimeter read zero. sometimes the multimeter, read 0.1 or 0.2 or 4. it uses the 5.8 cm band. how do i build an antenna that can pick up a radio signal from this ts832?
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
My first guess would be there's a mismatch between your wire that you're using as an antenna and the board or connector. I would be surprised if they didn't choose a thickness/width, shape to those antennas beyond its length to achieve a certain characteristic impedance (often 50 Ohms). Quick note just in case readers might not be familiar, that resistance, impedance, and characteristic impedance are not the same. Would you be able to try another wire that has a different diameter compared to your first one?

I've heard stories of people mucking around with coat hangers until they can get it to pick up a signal. I'm not sure you'll be so lucky if the TS832 really is 5.8 GHz (I'm looking at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MLS0NOW/?tag=pfamazon01-20). You could try. I'm no expert with antennas, but I thought the length should be like 12.9 cm if it's just copper in air... I chose that number because it's λ/4...
 
  • #3
so you think i should use 12.9 cm and a different diameter? should i use a thicker diameter or a thinner diameter?
 
  • #4
David lopez said:
i have ts832 transmitter and a rs832 receiver
You mean RC832 ? With an antenna ? Why not use that ?
 
  • Like
Likes berkeman
  • #5
Let's try it in steps and just do the length first. You might be able to get something from it.

This isn't my area of expertise (antennas that is), but I would try approximately a twin wire transmission line and impedance match roughly using that. I'd use an online calculator like this with a dielectric constant of 1 (vacuum or air), and a permeability constant of 1 (as long as it's not nickel, iron...). Measure the spacing between the terminals for input 3 and choose a few different diameters until you can get about 50 Ohms.

https://www.rfwireless-world.com/calculators/Twin-wire-line-calculator.html
 
  • #6
so make sure the antenna has 50 ohms?
 
  • #7
That's what I would try.
 
  • #8
so make sure the resistance of the copper wire is 50 ohm?
 
  • #9
@David lopez you have not answered the question by @BvU
BvU said:
You mean RC832 ? With an antenna ? Why not use that ?
1580782833639.png

If you have a complete receiver for this link testing, why are you trying to make your own antenna?

David lopez said:
so make sure the antenna has 50 ohms?
If you have one of these:

https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/k08AAOSwrdlcaD3b/s-l300.jpg

1580782924443.png
 
  • #10
BvU said:
You mean RC832 ? With an antenna ? Why not use that ?
because i am trying to get more range. an antenna picks up the radio signals from ts832 transmitter and sends the signal to a second antenna that will retransmit the signal at higher frequency to get longer range.
 
  • #11
you still have not answered my question, so i make sure the piece of copper wire has a resistance of 50 ohms?
 
  • #12
David lopez said:
you still have not answered my question, so i make sure the piece of copper wire has a resistance of 50 ohms?
Of course not, since your question is nonsense, yet again. You are trying to learn, and that is a good thing. But you are stumbling around in areas where you can cause harmful communication interference to others, and that is not good.

And even though you are finally trying to use canned transmitters and receivers for your projects, you are asking us for help violating the law by replacing the standard monopole antennas with high gain Yagi antennas, which will likely violate the Tx power testing that was done on those licensed transmitters.

As much as I admire your desire to learn and do EE projects, it is time you had a brief vacation from the PF. We do not tolerate repeated efforts to violate the law.
 
  • Like
  • Love
Likes davenn, Averagesupernova, BvU and 1 other person

Related to I tried to build a radio receiver

1. How do I build a radio receiver?

Building a radio receiver involves several steps, including gathering materials, understanding circuit diagrams, and assembling the components. You will also need to have a basic understanding of electronics and radio frequency principles.

2. What materials do I need to build a radio receiver?

The materials needed will depend on the type of radio receiver you want to build. However, some common materials include a circuit board, resistors, capacitors, inductors, a tuner, and an antenna. You may also need a soldering iron and solder, wire cutters, and a power supply.

3. Do I need any prior knowledge to build a radio receiver?

While it is not necessary to have a deep understanding of electronics, it is helpful to have some basic knowledge. This includes understanding how to read circuit diagrams, identify electronic components, and use a soldering iron. There are also many online resources and tutorials available to help guide you through the process.

4. How long does it take to build a radio receiver?

The time it takes to build a radio receiver will vary depending on your level of experience, the complexity of the receiver, and the availability of materials. It could take anywhere from a few hours to several days to complete the project.

5. Can I modify or improve my radio receiver?

Yes, you can modify or improve your radio receiver by experimenting with different components, adjusting the circuit, or adding new features. This can help you better understand how the receiver works and improve its performance.

Similar threads

  • Electrical Engineering
2
Replies
44
Views
2K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
17
Views
3K
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
33
Views
4K
Replies
20
Views
1K
Replies
68
Views
4K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
16
Views
4K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
29
Views
3K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
9
Views
5K
Replies
9
Views
2K
Back
Top