I want to know the differences about isothermal process.

In summary, the conversation discusses the differences between reversible-isothermal-expansion and irreversible-isothermal-expansion and whether their entropy is the same. The speaker references a Physics Forums Insights article for further information and prompts the other person to consider the initial and final states of the system and the amount of work and heat for each path. The conversation ends with a person named Chet adding his input.
  • #1
An jinsu
2
0
I'm sorry for bad english.
I wonder what is the differences between reversible-isothermal-expansion and irreversible-isothermal-expansion.
Is their entropy same?
 
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  • #2
Hi there
welcome to PF :smile:

what have you discovered so far in your online research ?
what there anything in information that you found that you didn't quite understand ?

cheers
Dave
 
  • #3
An jinsu said:
I'm sorry for bad english.
I wonder what is the differences between reversible-isothermal-expansion and irreversible-isothermal-expansion.
Is their entropy same?
The answer to your question is covered in my recent Physics Forums Insights article at the following link: https://www.physicsforums.com/insights/reversible-vs-irreversible-gas-compressionexpansion-work/

Regarding the entropy change, are the initial states of the system for the two paths the same? Are the final states of the system for the two paths the same? If so, what can you say about the entropy change? Even if the initial and final states for the two paths are the same, are the amount of work W and the amount of heat Q the same?

Chet
 

Related to I want to know the differences about isothermal process.

What is an isothermal process?

An isothermal process is a thermodynamic process in which the temperature remains constant throughout. This means that the heat energy added to or removed from the system is equal to the work done by or on the system, resulting in no change in temperature.

What are the key differences between an isothermal process and an adiabatic process?

The key difference between an isothermal process and an adiabatic process is that in an isothermal process, the temperature remains constant, whereas in an adiabatic process, there is no transfer of heat between the system and its surroundings. This means that the temperature can change in an adiabatic process.

How is an isothermal process different from an isobaric process?

An isothermal process is different from an isobaric process in that an isothermal process has a constant temperature, while an isobaric process has a constant pressure. This means that in an isobaric process, the volume can change, while in an isothermal process, the volume remains constant.

What are some real-life examples of isothermal processes?

Some real-life examples of isothermal processes include the expansion of a gas in a cylinder with a movable piston, the vaporization of a liquid in a closed container, and the melting of a solid at a constant temperature.

What are the applications of isothermal processes in various industries?

Isothermal processes have various applications in different industries, such as refrigeration and air conditioning, chemical reactions, and power generation. They are also used in the production of food and beverages, pharmaceuticals, and in the study of atmospheric processes.

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