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B If you raise the electron to other higher shell states, can it affect light transmission?

  1. Feb 2, 2016 #1
    icon7.gif If you raise the electron to other higher shell states, can light transmission throug
    -h a SOLID BLACK opaque object.
    Modified the original question because it was unclear.
    I wont repeat the same question over, and over, but what I have said in previous questions may get repeated in the thread.
    Its all relative to what I am trying to do, so I hope the question does not get deleted, there is meaning to all the questions I ask, its how I learn.
    So the energy levels of EM waves increase asfrom radio to X-rays, to gamma waves.
    If put the electron in the highest shell, or a shell second to the highest, then shine a wavelength of light, that has the lowest wavelength, which is red light.
    So you shine this light at the when it is in its higher energy states, could this make electrons in something solid, and black be like glass electrons.
    So that these electrons do not get exited by this low wavelegth light, and could light pass through, and transmission through a SOLID BLACK object, and make it become a little transparent like 20% transparent, or more. Could the opacity of a material to one band of EM radiation (light) could be altered by raising the shell level of the electron in the material with another band of EM radiation (X rays)?
    By raising the electrons in the atoms to higher energy bands (with the X rays), so that they will no longer be in energy bands amenable to absorption of light wavelengths, the opacity of the material to light waves might be altered.
    Could this be done to make light transmission better through a SOLID BLACK object.
    To make the object 20% transparent.
    Its all about the energy of electrons, not the amount of electrons in a atom, and it does not make a difference if the material is amorphous.
    I am studying neuroscience, and am trying to figure out ways to make brain tissue less opaque, if at all possible.
    Think of it as looking through murky water, but still being able to see through the water.
    Thats what I want to do with the tissue.
    Thank you for your help, anything helps, even a few words.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 2, 2016 #2
    Do you have an inkling as to how much energy it takes to raise electrons in billions of atoms? You are certain to have plasma I would think...
     
  4. Feb 2, 2016 #3

    mfb

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    Old thread for reference

    You are wildly speculating far away from your knowledge. This is not productive.
    You cannot turn an opaque object transparent by shining light on it.

    There are extremely special cases where you can make objects more transparent to extremely narrow bands of wavelengths. This is called electromagnetically induced transparency.
    This does not work for brains. What do you want to do? There are wavelengths that have some reasonable range in brains.
     
  5. Feb 2, 2016 #4
    Great, thank you for your answer, your right that my knowledge is not that great on the subject.
    What I am trying to do us to see if a couple of microns of tissue can become at least 20% transparent. kind of like looking through murkey water. If it is possible to do.
    I keep thinking of new ways to try to do it , and it may come accress as the same thread, but its not exactly the same every time.
    Thank you for your help.
     
  6. Feb 2, 2016 #5

    mfb

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    A couple of microns? That should let a large fraction of light through. With a flashlight you can even see red light pass through your fingers, about 1 centimeter.
     
  7. Feb 2, 2016 #6
    exite the electron.
    Can you tell me what would be the outcome of this light experiment.
    So you mix X-rays with red light, the X-rays excite the electron to a higher shell level 2, or 3.
    Then the red light with the shortest wavelength, when it hits the electron as the electron is in shell 2, or 3 would the electron get excited, or not by the red light.
    The electron is only going to be in shell 2, and 3 for a for a very short time, but maybe the red light does not have the energy to excite the electron while it is in shell 2, and 3.
    Remember the red light, and X-rays are mixed together as a single wave, or more X-rays hit electrons first, then milliseconds later the red light hits the electron, whatever works best for the light to travel through a opaque SOLID material, kind of like glass.
    The effect I want to get is to make the electron not absorb light, for light to pass through, and make a object a little bit translucent, by 20%.
    Similar to glass, how electrons do not get excited by light.
    Thank you for your help, anything helps even a few wo
     
  8. Feb 2, 2016 #7

    Drakkith

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    It is not possible to do this with your current level of education. You would need to go through years of schooling to be able to understand physics sufficiently to even begin to try to do something like this.
     
  9. Feb 2, 2016 #8
    I agree need more scooliing, but do you think it CAN be done.


     
  10. Feb 3, 2016 #9

    DrDu

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    The keyword holeburning spectroscopy also comes to my mind.
     
  11. Feb 9, 2016 #10
    If you had simply asked the question and not said what you wanted it for, I would simply answer, yes. Look up optical pumping. There's a common undergraduate lab experiment where you shine light on rubidium gas and it becomes transparent.

    But then you mention stuff about making brain tissue transparent. Why would you want to do that? You would definitely do extreme damage to the brain tissue molecular structure. You'd better just forget about it.
     
  12. Feb 9, 2016 #11

    Drakkith

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    Thread locked.
     
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