Image formation in concave mirror

In summary: But if a person is between the mirror and the person viewing, the person viewing will see the image of the person between the mirror and him/her. who said mirror is transparent?Normally,mirror consist of a glass and a layer of aluminium(opaque).Mirror is an opaque object.When the light pass through the mirror, it just gets reflected. Thus image is very clear in the mirror...But if a person is between the mirror and the person viewing, the person viewing will see the image of the person between the mirror and him/her.
  • #1
Puneeth423
51
0
Can we see a real image with our naked eye without using a screen to capture image?
Also, we all know that virtual image formation in a concave mirror will be always erect. Check out the image below.
attachment.php?attachmentid=54985&stc=1&d=1359090614.png

Spoon here acts as a concave mirror and the image is inverted. Why is it virtual then?
 

Attachments

  • Capture.PNG
    Capture.PNG
    7.9 KB · Views: 2,273
Science news on Phys.org
  • #2
Puneeth423 said:
Can we see a real image with our naked eye without using a screen to capture image?

Yes, we can :smile:

Puneeth423 said:
Also, we all know that virtual image formation in a concave mirror will be always erect. Check out the image below.
attachment.php?attachmentid=54985&stc=1&d=1359090614.png

Spoon here acts as a concave mirror and the image is inverted. Why is it virtual then?

How do you know it is virtual?

ehild
 
  • #3
ehild said:
Yes, we can :smile:



How do you know it is virtual?

ehild

The image appears to be inside spoon.
 
  • #4
It looks inside, but not behind. Try to use a torch and a small piece of tracing paper to catch the image.

ehild
 
Last edited:
  • #5
ehild said:
It looks inside, but not behind. Try to use a torch and a small piece of tracing paper to catch the image.

ehild

Whats the difference if it appears behind or it is seen inside the mirror?
We can catch the real image on a paper. But my question is about the image which we are seeing inside the mirror?
 
  • #6
The image in the spoon is real. It looks not inside the mirror but inside the spoon. ( If you have soup with that spoon, the soup is inside, not behind. So is with the image. )
Get closer to the spoon. The image gets closer and closer to you, at the end you see the image at your nose. :)

The image you see in a plane mirror looks behind the mirror (you can say inside the world behind the mirror.) The mirror is just a thin layer of aluminium on a glass sheet, you can not see a picture inside it. That image seen in a plane mirror is virtual and erect. You can not catch it with a screen.

ehild
 
  • #7
ehild said:
The image in the spoon is real. It looks not inside the mirror but inside the spoon. ( If you have soup with that spoon, the soup is inside, not behind. So is with the image. )
Get closer to the spoon. The image gets closer and closer to you, at the end you see the image at your nose. :)

The image you see in a plane mirror looks behind the mirror (you can say inside the world behind the mirror.) The mirror is just a thin layer of aluminium on a glass sheet, you can not see a picture inside it. That image seen in a plane mirror is virtual and erect. You can not catch it with a screen.

ehild

Ok. You are telling that the image which i see is image of the real image which forms or the diverging rays which after forming a real image enters my eyes and form an image of the inverted real image?
 
  • #8
Yes. The rays reflected from the mirror meet and form the real image, but go further and reach your eye. The lenses of your eyes form real images on the retina. You observe those images and you see them at the place from where the diverging beams originated.

ehild
 
  • #9
ehild said:
Yes. The rays reflected from the mirror meet and form the real image, but go further and reach your eye. The lenses of your eyes form real images on the retina. You observe those images and you see them at the place from where the diverging beams originated.

ehild

We can see this image only if the real image is formed in front of us. What happens if the rays enter our eyes before they form the real image?(for ex: If you place yourself between focal point and radius of curvature of the mirror, your eye will receive the rays before they form the real image. What will happen here?)
 
Last edited:
  • #10
In case the image would form behind the eye, it is negative object distance, a virtual object. The image must form on the retina to be seen, so the eye must be placed at a specific point. The image on the retina is real, but the object is virtual, image distance/ object distance is negative, the image is erect.

If you place your eye before the real image from the mirror or lens and you see a clear image, it is erect. That is why you see normally when wearing glasses.

ehild,
 
  • #11
Mirror is an opaque object.
 
  • #12
nitish3112 said:
Mirror is an opaque object.
Who said mirror is transparent?Normally,mirror consist of a glass and a layer of aluminium(opaque).
 
  • #13
Mirror is an opaque object.When the light pass through the mirror, it just gets reflected. Thus image is very clear in the mirror alone.
 
  • #14
We will definitely get a clear image ,
Nitish
 
  • #15
nitish3112 said:
Mirror is an opaque object.When the light pass through the mirror, it just gets reflected. Thus image is very clear in the mirror alone.
What do you mean?Normal mirrors consist of a glass layer(Transparent) and an Aluminium layer(Opaque).

And if you are considering the Aluminium layer alone,light doesn't pass through it,but gets reflected.Light doesn't pass through things in order to get reflected,it touches the boundary of it.
 
  • #16
ehild said:
The image in the spoon is real. It looks not inside the mirror but inside the spoon. ( If you have soup with that spoon, the soup is inside, not behind. So is with the image. )
Get closer to the spoon. The image gets closer and closer to you, at the end you see the image at your nose. :) ehild
How is this image seen? We haven't put any screen in front of the mirror to obtain this image. Then how are we watching this image?
 
  • #17
Harnoor Singh Sandhu said:
How is this image seen? We haven't put any screen in front of the mirror to obtain this image. Then how are we watching this image?
Why do you think you need a screen to see a real image?
 
  • #18
Also: how exactly do we see a virtual image, without the help of a screen?
 
  • #19
jtbell said:
Also: how exactly do we see a virtual image, without the help of a screen?
You're just being naughty here, I suspect. :wink:
 

Related to Image formation in concave mirror

1. How does a concave mirror form an image?

A concave mirror forms an image by reflecting light rays that pass through a single focal point. The reflected rays converge and create a real or virtual image depending on the object's position relative to the mirror.

2. What is the difference between a real and virtual image in a concave mirror?

A real image is formed when the reflected rays actually converge at a point, and can be projected onto a screen. A virtual image is formed when the reflected rays appear to be coming from a point behind the mirror, and cannot be projected onto a screen.

3. How does the position of an object affect the image formed in a concave mirror?

The position of an object in relation to the focal point of a concave mirror affects the size and type (real or virtual) of the image formed. If the object is placed beyond the focal point, a real and inverted image is formed. If the object is placed between the focal point and the mirror, a virtual and upright image is formed.

4. Can a concave mirror produce a magnified image?

Yes, a concave mirror can produce a magnified image when the object is placed between the focal point and the mirror. The magnification depends on the distance of the object from the mirror and the focal length of the mirror.

5. What is the difference between a concave and convex mirror in terms of image formation?

A concave mirror forms real and virtual images depending on the object's position, while a convex mirror only forms virtual images. Convex mirrors also produce smaller and upright images regardless of the object's position, while concave mirrors can produce both enlarged and inverted images.

Similar threads

Replies
172
Views
15K
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
17
Views
2K
Replies
17
Views
4K
Replies
6
Views
3K
Replies
18
Views
5K
Replies
9
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
2K
Back
Top