Instantaneous Gas Compression: temperature increase?

In summary: The problem is you cannot calculate the final pressure from the increase in temperature, as this would require knowing the compressibility factor.
  • #1
FranzS
54
10
If I a have a gas confined in a certain initial volume Vin at a certain pressure Pin and at a certain temperature Tin, and istantaneously compress it down to a final volume Vfin < Vin, how do I calculate the increase in temperature?
Assume I know the exact pressure curve (P vs. V).
The system cannot exchange heat (I guess that's redundant with "istantaneous compression").
 
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  • #2
That is called adiabatic compression. I can look up the formula later, but if you need it quickly just search for adiabatic compression.
 
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  • #3
Do you mean, like, suddenly increasing the pressure of the surroundings from ##p_i## to ##p_f## so that the gas undergoes irreversible and adiabatic compression?
 
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  • #4
You can do that with the Poisson equations. The limitation is that the system must be in thermodynamic equilibrium at all times, so not 'instantaneous' compression.
 
  • #5
The Poisson equations are derived for a barotropic flow and calorically perfect gas.
 
  • #6
@Arjan82 and @Dale your equations only apply to reversible processes but to me at least it doesn't sound from OPs description (instantaneous ##\leftrightarrow## fast?) like a reversible process. @FranzS, can you clarify?

I had in mind that if - for example - the surrounding pressure is raised suddenly from ##p_i## to ##p_f > p_i## and held at ##p_f## then the temperature change due to the irreversible compression, given ##\partial U / \partial T = C_V## always for an ideal gas and also ##Q = 0##, would satisfy ##\Delta T = -\frac{p_f}{C_V}\Delta V##
 
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  • #7
Dale said:
If there is no time for heat exchange then entropy is constant and the process is indeed reversible.
It's not necessarily true i.e. you can have irreversible adiabatic processes (##Q=0##). For an irreversible process ##dS > \delta Q / T## so even with ##\delta Q = 0## the system undergoes an entropy increase; it reflects that during an irreversible process entropy is generated inside the system

e.g. my example in #7 is adiabatic, irreversible and ##\Delta S > 0##
 
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  • #8
etotheipi said:
@Arjan82 and @Dale your equations only apply to reversible processes but to me at least it doesn't sound from OPs description (instantaneous ##\leftrightarrow## fast?) like a reversible process. @FranzS, can you clarify?

I had in mind that if - for example - the surrounding pressure is raised suddenly from ##p_i## to ##p_f > p_i## and held at ##p_f## then the temperature change due to the irreversible compression, given ##\partial U / \partial T = C_V## always for an ideal gas and also ##Q = 0##, would satisfy ##\Delta T = -\frac{p_f}{C_V}\Delta V##
Yes, as you said, this process definitely results in an increase in entropy. Nice assessment!
 
  • #9
etotheipi said:
Do you mean, like, suddenly increasing the pressure of the surroundings from ##p_i## to ##p_f## so that the gas undergoes irreversible and adiabatic compression?
Yes but I'm confused.
I'd like to clarify my initial statement:
FranzS said:
Assume I know the exact pressure curve (P vs. V).
I meant I know the isothermal ##P## vs. ##V## curve for any given temperature.
But this compression is not isothermal of course.
And I do not know the final pressure ##P_f##, actually that's the ultimate goal which I'd like to calculate from the increase in temperature!
 
  • #10
etotheipi said:
to me at least it doesn't sound from OPs description (instantaneous ##\leftrightarrow## fast?) like a reversible process. @FranzS, can you clarify?
For "istantaneous" I mean that it occurs in a time ##t \rightarrow 0##, which I believe excludes the possibility of heat exchange with the surroundings.
Please note that I know exact initial volume, exact final volume, exact initial pressure. I do not know final pressure in this process, although I know exact final pressure*** if it were an isothermal process (in other words, a compression that occurs in a time ##t \rightarrow \infty## where the system can this time exchange heat with the surroundings).
*** With exact [isothermal] final pressure, I mean compressibility factor included.
 
  • #11
FranzS said:
And I do not know the final pressure ##P_f##, actually that's the ultimate goal which I'd like to calculate from the increase in temperature!
Okay, well I suppose we ought to start with ##T_f - T_i = -\frac{p_f}{C_V}(V_f - V_i)## from post #6. For an ideal gas the equation ##V = nRT/p## applies at the initial and final equilibrium states so you may write ##V_i = nRT_i/p_i## and ##V_f = nRT_f/p_f##, so$$T_f - T_i = \frac{-nRp_f}{C_V} \left( \frac{T_f}{p_f} - \frac{T_i}{p_i} \right) =\frac{nRT_i }{C_V}\left( \frac{p_f}{p_i} \right) - \frac{nRT_f}{C_V} $$I'll leave it to you to rearrange it how you like!
 
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  • #12
etotheipi said:
Okay, well I suppose we ought to start with ##T_f - T_i = -\frac{p_f}{C_V}(V_f - V_i)## from post #6. For an ideal gas the equation ##V = nRT/p## is always true, so you may write ##V_i = nRT_i/p_i## and ##V_f = nRT_f/p_f##, so$$T_f - T_i = \frac{-nRp_f}{C_V} \left( \frac{T_f}{p_f} - \frac{T_i}{p_i} \right) =\frac{nRT_i }{C_V}\left( \frac{p_f}{p_i} \right) - \frac{nRT_f}{C_V} $$I'll leave it to you to rearrange it how you like!
The problem is I would like to find out ##\Delta T## and use it to find ##P_f##. But I guess I can't, since the two are related because of the work done during compression depends on ##P##.
I'm using the real gas law ##PV=ZnRT## where I know a pretty accurate expression for the compressibility factor ##Z(P, T)##.
Should I throw ##PV=Z(P,T)nRT## in your last equation? I guess it'll become a mess.
 
  • #13
I'm not sure. Our resident thermodynamics expert @Chestermiller will probably know! :smile:
 
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  • #14
FranzS said:
The problem is I would like to find out ##\Delta T## and use it to find ##P_f##. But I guess I can't, since the two are related because of the work done during compression depends on ##P##.
I'm using the real gas law ##PV=ZnRT## where I know a pretty accurate expression for the compressibility factor ##Z(P, T)##.
Should I throw ##PV=Z(P,T)nRT## in your last equation? I guess it'll become a mess.
The ideal gas law or any real gas equation of state is valid only at thermodynamic equilibrium. The rapid adiabatic compression of a gas is an irreversible process in which all the states that the gas passes through between the initial and final states are not thermodynamic equilibrium states. Therefore, the equation of state can not be used for these non-equilibrium states, and, if you try to use it, it will give the wrong answer for gas pressure on the piston face and for the work. In such a case, the only way that thermodynamics can be used to solve such a compression problem is to specify the pressure manually, as the pressure exerted by the piston face on the gas as a function of the gas volume. This is what etotheipi did, by specifying that the pressure on the gas is held constant during the compression at some specified value much higher than the original equilibrium gas pressure. This is about the best you are going to do.
 
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1. How does instantaneous gas compression affect temperature?

Instantaneous gas compression causes an increase in temperature due to the gas molecules being compressed into a smaller volume, resulting in an increase in kinetic energy and therefore temperature.

2. What factors influence the temperature increase in instantaneous gas compression?

The temperature increase in instantaneous gas compression is influenced by the initial temperature, pressure, and volume of the gas, as well as the rate and duration of the compression process.

3. Is the temperature increase in instantaneous gas compression reversible?

No, the temperature increase in instantaneous gas compression is irreversible. Once the gas molecules have been compressed and their kinetic energy has increased, they cannot return to their original state without external energy input.

4. How does the ideal gas law relate to instantaneous gas compression?

The ideal gas law, which states that pressure is directly proportional to temperature and inversely proportional to volume, explains the relationship between temperature and pressure in instantaneous gas compression. As the gas is compressed, its volume decreases, causing an increase in pressure and temperature.

5. What are the practical applications of instantaneous gas compression?

Instantaneous gas compression is used in various industrial processes, such as in refrigeration systems, gas turbines, and air compressors. It is also used in scientific experiments, such as in shock tubes, to study the behavior of gases under extreme conditions.

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