Is it possible to dissolve diamonds with water?

In summary, a diamond will not dissolve in water, but shooting helium nuclei at it will etch away material.
  • #1

pkt

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Is it possible to dissolve diamonds with water?
 
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  • #2
No.
 
  • #3
Do you see any reason to expect that?

No. At least not in any relevant amount.
 
  • #5
@pkt if you knew the answer why did you post the question?

PF is here to help students with questions from STEM subjects. We are a team of volunteers here trying to help out and we don't pose questions to fool others. It is our hope that you won't repeat this strategy in the future.
 
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  • #6
That is not really "dissolving diamonds in water". They superheated water and put it under extremely high pressure between diamonds and graphene. That damaged the diamond.
 
  • #8
pkt said:

If this is what you mean by "dissolve", then you have a very strange and unconventional definition of it. So not only should you have posted this link at the very beginning of your post, you should have also revealed your personal definition of "dissolve".

Otherwise, this is not what we conventionally will call "dissolve".

Zz.
 
  • #9
Smells like a philosopher's spirit. AFAIK, this community is not about that life.
 
  • #10
[Mentor's note: Some unnecessary snark, in violation of the Physics Forums rules, has been edited out of this post]

Etching is very much dissolving.
 
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  • #11
You just didn't understand the article you linked later, or you phrased your question in a wrong way.

Can helium dissolve a diamond? No. But if you shoot helium nuclei (or atoms) at a diamond you can certainly etch some material away.
 
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  • #12
pkt said:
Etching is very much dissolving.

When you get to the bottom of a hole, it's best to stop digging.

What they are doing is not dissolving since the water does not contain any carbon in solution afterwards.

pkt said:
stump the egghead and I got two on the first try

Again, when you get to the bottom of a hole, it's best to stop digging.
 
  • #13
mfb said:
But if you shoot helium nuclei (or atoms) at a diamond you can certainly etch some material away.

Or a laser. Does that mean carbon dissolves in light?
 
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  • #14
Any form of erosion will etch
But the process of abrasion with a non solvent will only form a suspension not a solution
 

1. Can diamonds be dissolved with water?

No, diamonds cannot be dissolved with water. Water is a polar molecule, meaning it has both negative and positive ends. Diamonds, on the other hand, are nonpolar and do not have any charged ends that will react with water to break down its molecular structure.

2. Is there any substance that can dissolve diamonds?

Yes, there are a few substances that can dissolve diamonds, such as molten iron or magma. These substances have extreme temperatures and chemical properties that can break down the strong bonds between carbon atoms in diamonds.

3. How long does it take for a diamond to dissolve in water?

Since water cannot dissolve diamonds, it would take an infinite amount of time for a diamond to dissolve in water. It would remain intact and unchanged in water.

4. Can acid dissolve diamonds?

Yes, certain acids such as hydrofluoric acid can dissolve diamonds. This acid can react with the carbon atoms in diamonds and break them down, resulting in the dissolution of the diamond. However, this process may take a long time and is not practical for dissolving diamonds.

5. What happens to a diamond when it is dissolved?

When a diamond is dissolved, it breaks down into smaller carbon molecules, such as graphite, which is the most stable form of carbon. The diamond loses its crystal structure and becomes a different substance altogether.

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