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Programs Is it worth it to get a Bachelor of Mathematics after a PhD in Physics?

  1. Mar 12, 2016 #1
    Everybody knows Mathematics it's an important field in every Science; and in Physics even more. So, if you have a PhD in Physics, for example Astrophysics; is it worthly to get a degree in Mathematics?
    I know that maybe there's some courses that would be completely useless in Physics, but you know, maybe it's better for getting a job. What do you think about this? Has anybody a PhD in Physics and a Bachelor on Mathematics?
     
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  3. Mar 12, 2016 #2

    micromass

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    So you have a PhD in physics, and you want to know whether a bachelor in math is useful? No, it's not. It won't open up any more job opportunities than you already have now. Of course, if you're really interested in pure or applied mathematics, then go for it. But do it out of interest since there is no other good reason to do this.
     
  4. Mar 13, 2016 #3

    pasmith

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    There are a great many people who have a bachelor's in mathematics and a PhD in physics, but I expect that all of them would have obtained the bachelor's before embarking on their PhD.
     
  5. Mar 25, 2016 #4
    From what I understand, a Bachelor's in Mathematics is good for those who want to continue onto graduate school but not good for those who want a terminal degree.
     
  6. Mar 28, 2016 #5
    A PhD in Physics requires a lot of mathematical knowledge. Often the math is taught as part of the physics, but just the parts needed. But you will still need to take differential equations, linear algebra, vector analysis, and complex analysis. Sometimes a school will offer a couple of courses in "applied math for scientists and engineers', or some such name. A PhD followed by a BA/BS in math makes little sense. Heck, take some graduate math and get an MS in math if that floats your boat, but don't expect the market to care too much.
     
  7. Mar 28, 2016 #6

    symbolipoint

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    One possible logical reason for getting an undergraduate degree in Mathematics, AFTER earning PhD in Physics, is to justify your eligibility in your state for you to teach Mathematics in junior high schools or high schools. Yes! For that, you need either the undergraduate degree in MATHEMATICS, or the equivalent.
     
  8. Mar 29, 2016 #7
    To teach middle or high school math you would need a degree in mathematics education. The actual math content of the degree would be considerably less than for a straight math degree. The system in almost all states is heavily biased towards education degrees where you do a couple of internships teaching under supervision. It matters not a whit that you taught undergraduates in college. I know, I tried for years to get a teaching job in a HS. I taught freshman courses in college as a GTA, passed the state exam easily, but did not have that all important education degree. In general, you cannot just take the required education courses to qualify, except at Western Governors University, an online program. Lot cheaper than a BSE too.
     
  9. Mar 29, 2016 #8
    I'm currently a PhD student in physics and have bachelor's degrees in both physics and mathematics. The math degree hasn't been of much use.
     
  10. Mar 29, 2016 #9

    symbolipoint

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    Do you know the official statement of requirements, and for which State this if for?
     
  11. Mar 30, 2016 #10

    Western Governor's University program to get people certified as teachers covers almost every state to my knowledge. You can go to their web site and get more info. They will assist you in finding a school to do an internship. For a specific state go to the state licensing board for teachers. Some states have a program where a person without an education degree can apply for a teaching job and get certified after a year or two. I can tell you from experience the chances of that happening are low. But you can try. Again, check with your state board, or maybe call a local school system. Good luck.
     
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