Is there a computer program to extract values from a video?

In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of using a computer program to extract values from a video, such as size, speed of an object, and dimensions. It is mentioned that while some video playing programs may provide some information, it is currently not possible to accurately extract information about objects in a video due to the limitations of technology. The conversation also mentions the use of multiple cameras and advanced software to track objects in videos, but these methods are still in their early stages. Overall, the conversation highlights the challenges and limitations of extracting values from videos and the current state of technology in this area.
  • #1
reki
2
0
is there a computer program to extract values from a video? (like size, speed of an object, dimensions, etc.)
 
Computer science news on Phys.org
  • #2


Are you asking about the video parameters or something about the contents? If it is the contents I don't know of any, but it sounds like a hard problem.

As for the video parameters, many of the video playing programs, such as Window Media Player or Realplayer provide much of the information, depending partly on the video format.
 
  • #3


I'm asking about objects from the content of the video.
Saw it in a couple of movies and it could be helpful for me in a personal project.
Should exist, maybe in criminology...
 
  • #4


At the present level of technology, video is not coded in terms of objects. It's just a flat rectangular picture and a set of rules that prescribe how to construct frame #N+1 from frames #N, #N-1, etc. The best you can do is calculate the speed of movement of some point of the video, in pixels per second. You can't backtrack from that to physical movement. Most of the time, if you want physical movement, you need videos from two cameras with predetermined distance between them, and predetermined optical properties such as field of view angle and optical distortion characteristics (though there are tricks that will let you deduce field of view and optical distortion from the video).

Things you see in movies often have no relation to the state of technology in the real world. It always gets me in movies and detective shows, when "technicians" take a grainy 320x240 shot from an ATM camera and use it to zoom in onto a license plate in the background. CSI and Law & Order are often guilty of that. I actually work on digital video for a living and I like to think that I know what can or can't be done.

There's been a shift towards three-dimensional video recently (heard of Avatar?) and, with that kind of video (which is basically two parallel tracks from two different fixed cameras), you can do some 3D reconstruction using 3D algorithms. Even then it's not easy. There's an open-source library called OpenCV, but I haven't personally worked with that one. In my opinion, 10 years from now there will be a universally adopted true 3D standard, but, for now, that work is in its infancy.
 
  • #5
  • #6


Jeff Reid said:
Using multiple cameras along with knowledge of ball size and the court layout, systems like Hawk Eye can track objects very accurately.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawk-Eye

Tracking a small unobstructed ball with multiple cameras is a relatively easy task.

Now imagine doing the same with a human. Step 1 is to identify views of the same features through different cameras. You'll get a good fix on some sharp features such as eyes, corners of the mouth, and buttons. The computer will draw a blank in all flat areas. It can't match contours, unless it has a built-in 3D model of the object (easy with a rigid ball, harder with, say, a car, very hard with a fully clothed human). If cameras are too close too each other, precision of the reconstruction goes down. If cameras are too far, some features end up visible through only one camera.

When Hollywood CG designers do motion tracking, they use 5+ cameras and many compact reflective markers on the actor's body, to aid the computer.
 
  • #7


Some of the high end high speed camera manufacturers, provide software that have the ability to perform the tasks you ask.
 
  • #8


There are various player that can do this...for e.g smplayer (on Linux).

Install mplayer and see.
 

Related to Is there a computer program to extract values from a video?

1. Can a computer program accurately extract values from any video?

While some computer programs may claim to be able to extract values from any video, the accuracy of the extracted values may vary depending on the quality and type of video. It is important to choose a reliable and accurate program for your specific video needs.

2. How does a computer program extract values from a video?

Computer programs use algorithms and machine learning techniques to analyze the video and identify specific patterns or values. They may also use image recognition technology to identify and extract values from specific frames in the video.

3. Can a computer program extract multiple values from a single video?

Yes, many computer programs are capable of extracting multiple values from a single video. This is especially useful for videos that contain a large amount of data or multiple data points.

4. Are there any limitations to using a computer program to extract values from a video?

Some limitations may include the quality of the video, the availability of certain types of values, and the complexity of the data. It is important to choose a program that can handle your specific video and data needs.

5. Can a computer program extract values from live video feeds?

Yes, some computer programs are designed to extract values from live video feeds in real-time. This can be useful for monitoring and analyzing data in various industries such as sports, security, and healthcare.

Similar threads

Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Computing and Technology
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Computing and Technology
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Computing and Technology
Replies
1
Views
574
  • Computing and Technology
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Computing and Technology
Replies
32
Views
1K
Replies
17
Views
1K
  • Computing and Technology
Replies
1
Views
3K
Replies
19
Views
2K

Back
Top