Is there a mistake in this solution?

  • Thread starter zeion
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In summary, the problem is that the last term in the equation is -C/A, which is not what it should be.
  • #1
zeion
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1

Homework Statement



I'm given an equation Ax + By + C = 0
The answer in the back says:

If B not= 0, the set is the graph of f(x) = (-A/B)x + (-C/A)

How can the last term be (-C/A)??

Shouldn't it be C/B ?



Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution



y = (-Ax - C)/B
y = (-A/B)x - (C/B)
 
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  • #2
Yes it should be C/B. Perhaps it is a typo?
 
  • #3
Looks like there's probably an error in the back of the book (or in the front where the problem statement is, depending on how you look at it). You math looks good to me.
 
  • #4
yes, you are right, -C/B is correct.

I don't know why but math textbook has lots of errors like this.
 
  • #5
I am greatly confused! You ask "How can the last term be (-C/A)?? Shouldn't it be C/B ?"
but then everyone agrees withy you that it should be -C/A?

What am I missing?
 
  • #6
I think you are missing this part

"3. The Attempt at a Solution

y = (-Ax - C)/B
y = (-A/B)x - (C/B) "

so zeion's attempt is right
 
Last edited:
  • #7
Yes, I saw that. His answer was correct and exactly the same as
"The answer in the back says:
If B not= 0, the set is the graph of f(x) = (-A/B)x + (-C/A)"

So why is he asking
"How can the last term be (-C/A)??
Shouldn't it be C/B ?"

And why has no one attempted to answer that question (if you understood it)?
 
  • #8
HallsofIvy said:
I am greatly confused! You ask "How can the last term be (-C/A)?? Shouldn't it be C/B ?"
but then everyone agrees withy you that it should be -C/A?

What am I missing?
Instead of the bolded, do you mean -C/B? Are you bringing to our attention the negative? Should zeion have said this?

zeion said:
If B not= 0, the set is the graph of f(x) = (-A/B)x + (-C/A)

How can the last term be (-C/A)??

Shouldn't it be (-C/B)?


P.S. What I'm confused about is that I remembered that there were a lot more posts in this thread than there currently are. Were some of them deleted?
 

1. What is the most common mistake in a scientific solution?

The most common mistake in a scientific solution is a calculation or measurement error. This can occur due to human error, equipment malfunction, or faulty data.

2. How can I check for mistakes in my solution?

You can check for mistakes in your solution by carefully reviewing your calculations, double-checking your data, and using multiple methods to verify your results.

3. What should I do if I find a mistake in my solution?

If you find a mistake in your solution, you should revise your work and make the necessary corrections. It is important to document and explain the mistake for future reference.

4. How can I prevent mistakes in my scientific solutions?

To prevent mistakes in your scientific solutions, you should follow proper procedures, use reliable equipment, and carefully record and analyze your data. It is also helpful to have another scientist review your work.

5. Are mistakes always a bad thing in scientific solutions?

No, mistakes are not always a bad thing in scientific solutions. They can provide valuable insights and lead to new discoveries. However, it is important to identify and correct mistakes to ensure the accuracy and reliability of your results.

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