Lab writeup, resonance & speed of sound

In summary, the lab involved using an adjustable tube and different tuning forks to reach resonance. The frequencies were graphed against 1/lamda, which is the inverse of lamda, to find the slope of the linear line which represents the velocity of sound in the experiment. This was done to show the inverse relationship between wavelength and frequency, and to demonstrate the constant speed of sound in a given medium.
  • #1
SphericalStrife
8
0
ok I'm definitely having trouble with this lab due tomorrow. We did a lab in class where you get an adjustable tube and use different tuning forks. With the different frequencies of the forks we adjusted the tubes until it reached resonance? (loudess point) Alright so we got a bunch of numbers and when it came down to it we were asked to graph the frequencies vs. 1/lamda, 1/lamda being the inverse of lamda. For my lab writeup I need to explain why we graphed this frequency vs. lamda. Now i know when i graph it, the slope of this Linear line is the velocity of sound in my experiment. I need to understand the significance of why we're graphing with 1/lamda...

What is 1/lamda vs. frequency?

frequency = oscillations/second, 1/length of wavelength
so what I'm getting is
oscillations/second*wavelength?
What is that??
 
Last edited:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
SphericalStrife said:
ok I'm definitely having trouble with this lab due tomorrow. We did a lab in class where you get an adjustable tube and use different tuning forks. With the different frequencies of the forks we adjusted the tubes until it reached resonance? (loudess point) Alright so we got a bunch of numbers and when it came down to it we were asked to graph the frequencies vs. 1/lamda, 1/lamda being the inverse of lamda. For my lab writeup I need to explain why we graphed this frequency vs. lamda. Now i know when i graph it, the slope of this Linear line is the velocity of sound in my experiment. I need to understand the significance of why we're graphing with 1/lamda...

What is 1/lamda vs. frequency?

frequency = oscillations/second, 1/length of wavelength
so what I'm getting is
oscillations/second*wavelength?
What is that??


Hi,

you are showing that wavelength(lamda) is inversely proportional to frequency.

And lastly, that the speed of sound is constant, for a given medium, from the formula speed = (lamda )wavelength* frequency(hz)
 
  • #3



The lab you described is investigating the relationship between frequency and wavelength in determining the speed of sound. By using an adjustable tube and tuning forks of different frequencies, you were able to find the point of resonance where the sound produced was the loudest. This resonance occurs when the frequency of the tuning fork matches the natural frequency of the tube.

To explain why the graph was created using 1/lambda vs. frequency, it is important to understand the relationship between frequency, wavelength, and speed of sound. The speed of sound can be calculated by multiplying the frequency and wavelength, as shown in the equation v = f * lambda. Therefore, the slope of the graph of 1/lambda vs. frequency will represent the speed of sound in your experiment.

But why use 1/lambda instead of just lambda? This is because 1/lambda is known as the wave number, which is a unit used to measure the number of waves per unit length. By graphing 1/lambda instead of lambda, the slope of the graph will directly represent the wave number, which in turn represents the speed of sound.

In other words, the graph of 1/lambda vs. frequency allows for a direct measurement of the wave number and subsequently the speed of sound, without having to perform additional calculations.

To answer your question, 1/lambda vs. frequency represents the relationship between the wave number and frequency, which can then be used to determine the speed of sound in your experiment. I hope this helps clarify the significance of this graph in your lab writeup. Good luck!
 

What is a lab writeup?

A lab writeup is a detailed report that documents the methods, procedures, results, and conclusions of a scientific experiment or investigation.

What is resonance?

Resonance is the phenomenon that occurs when an object vibrates at its natural frequency in response to an external force. This causes the object to amplify its vibration and produce a larger sound or vibration.

How is the speed of sound measured in a lab?

The speed of sound can be measured in a lab using an apparatus called a resonance tube. This instrument measures the length of a column of air that produces a standing wave when a tuning fork is placed at its opening. The length of the column of air is then used to calculate the speed of sound.

Why is the speed of sound important to study?

The speed of sound is important to study because it is a fundamental property of sound and is influenced by factors such as temperature, humidity, and medium. Understanding the speed of sound can help in fields such as acoustics, music, and engineering.

What are some real-world applications of resonance and the speed of sound?

Resonance and the speed of sound have many real-world applications, including in musical instruments, engineering and construction, and medical imaging. For example, the resonance of strings in a guitar or the sound waves in an ultrasound machine are based on principles of resonance and the speed of sound.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
2K
Replies
10
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
12
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
19
Views
465
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
5K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
6K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
1K
Back
Top