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LES of a hurricane

  1. Sep 9, 2016 #1
    Hi,

    I'm doing research in CFD and I'm trying to do a LES of a hurricane. Problem is, I don't remember much about LES. I took a class in CFD about a year and a half ago and most of it is gone. I've read the wikipedia page on LES but I'd like to dive in deeper. Does anyone have any suggestions?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 12, 2016 #2

    Andrew Mason

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    First of all, it would help if you stopped using arcane acronyms. Typing them out is more energy efficient than googling!

    I gather that LES stands for Large Eddy Simulation and CFD stands for Computational Fluid Dynamics. I would suggest and introductory text such as H K Versteeg and W Malalasekera, An Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 2nd Ed. which appears to be available for downloading for free on-line.

    AM
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2016
  4. Sep 12, 2016 #3

    boneh3ad

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    LES is a fairly advanced and new-ish topic. It is unlikely that an introductory text is going to spend enough time on the topic to allow you to be proficient enough to carry out a research-quality LES. An introductory text may be a decent place to start depending on your level of familiarity with CFD, but ultimately, there are entire textbooks dedicated to LES and it is an active area of research, so those more advanced books, research papers, and your research advisor and/or colleagues will be far better sources on LES-specific issues.

    The other thing you ought to ask yourself is whether or not doing an LES makes sense for your situation. Do you need that level of fidelity? Do you have sufficient computational resources for such a simulation? Even on supercomputers an LES might run for a week or more, let alone on a smaller cluster or, heaven forbid, a workstation.
     
  5. Sep 12, 2016 #4

    Andrew Mason

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    Since the OP's first thought was to check Wikipedia as he had forgotten most of his only course on CFD, I assumed he wanted something basic..... The text I suggested deals with the subject in chapter 3.8 and covers it in some detail.

    AM
     
  6. Sep 14, 2016 #5
    Than's for the answers. I'm trying to refresh my memory as we did deal with LES for a bit. To clarify: my job is to help a research team to model hurricanes in LES. I won't be doing much as far as the modeling itself goes. I will be doing programming in C for the team. Anyway, I'm trying to find a way in which to model the inlet velocity boundary conditions. I've tried searching Engineering Village, Google scholar, and Web of Science but I honestly can't come up with much that seems related. I find plenty of stuff on inlet conditions for turbines and such but I doubt that it's very useful.

    @ Mr Mason, I only used the acronyms as I assumed that anyone who would be able to help would know what they meant anyway. Naturally, I don't use them while I'm looking for literature or papers ;). I will take a look at that book.

    @boneh3ad: The resources are definitely not the issue. We have the computing power to run the simulations that we want, yes it takes several days to a week to run a simulation but that is already accounted for.
     
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