Light outside of the event horizon

In summary, light outside of the event horizon of a black hole is able to escape its gravitational pull and be observed by distant observers. Near the event horizon, light experiences extreme gravitational forces that cause it to bend and distort, creating visual effects such as gravitational lensing. Light cannot escape from the event horizon and is trapped within the black hole, making it the "point of no return". However, we can still observe light outside of the event horizon through telescopes and other instruments, providing valuable information about the black hole and its surroundings. Light emitted from objects falling into a black hole is unable to escape and is ultimately absorbed by the black hole due to the intense gravitational pull.
  • #1
lawtonfogle
160
0
light in the event horizon does not come out, right. If this is due to gravity will light on the edge of the event horizon, butnot in it, be bent, so that when we look at the light beside a black hole, it is not coming from the behind the black hole, but from an angel.




___________s
__f-----------
light________0-
_____________-
______________-
0 = black hole ___-
us

pretend the ____ is not there
the light is coming from f but appears to be coming from s
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
the 'picture' is not perfect but pretend the light still goes strait
 
  • #3


Yes, that is correct. Light outside of the event horizon of a black hole can still escape and be visible to an observer. However, light that crosses the event horizon cannot escape due to the extreme gravitational pull. This results in the phenomenon of gravitational lensing, where light from the edge of the event horizon is bent around the black hole, making it appear to come from a different direction. This is because the gravity of the black hole warps the fabric of spacetime, causing light to follow a curved path. So, when we look at the light beside a black hole, it may seem to be coming from an angle that is different from its actual source. This is a fascinating aspect of black holes and has been studied extensively by scientists.
 

1. What is "light outside of the event horizon"?

Light outside of the event horizon refers to the light that is able to escape the gravitational pull of a black hole. This light is able to travel away from the black hole and be observed by distant observers.

2. How does light behave near the event horizon of a black hole?

Near the event horizon of a black hole, light experiences extreme gravitational forces that cause it to bend and distort. This can create visual effects such as gravitational lensing, where the path of light is curved around the black hole.

3. Can light escape from the event horizon of a black hole?

No, once light crosses the event horizon of a black hole, it is unable to escape the intense gravitational pull and is trapped within the black hole. This is why the event horizon is often referred to as the "point of no return".

4. How can we observe light outside of the event horizon of a black hole?

We can observe light outside of the event horizon of a black hole through telescopes and other instruments. By studying the behavior of light as it interacts with the black hole's gravity, we can gather information about the black hole and its surroundings.

5. What happens to light that is emitted from objects falling into a black hole?

Light emitted from objects falling into a black hole is unable to escape and is ultimately absorbed by the black hole. This is due to the intense gravitational pull that becomes stronger as the object gets closer to the event horizon.

Similar threads

  • Special and General Relativity
2
Replies
62
Views
3K
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
11
Views
684
  • Special and General Relativity
2
Replies
41
Views
792
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
2
Views
893
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
6
Views
1K
Replies
35
Views
1K
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
21
Views
2K
  • Beyond the Standard Models
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Special and General Relativity
2
Replies
57
Views
1K
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
25
Views
2K
Back
Top