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Magnetic field simulation

  1. Feb 14, 2010 #1
    Hi guys, this is my first post!
    I have to simulate in 2D and 3D the magnetic field produced by two permanent magnets arranged vertically and separated by a distance d. For 2D simulation I used the excellent FEMM, I discovered googling on internet, and I must say we are very pleased with the results. About 3D simulation, I searched in the net and I found the software Ansoft Maxwell 3D, which seemed more than appropriate for my purposes. Only that I'm having some difficulty in using it. This is what I must do: graphically represent the magnetic field via its force lines, or via a colored flux density map (like FEMM) and calculate the magnetic field's intensity relatively to a plane between the two magnets.

    I've already defined the geometry of the problem, assigned the materials, changed the direction of magnetization through the thickness along the Z-axis (Maxwell's default is along the X-axis). What about boundary conditions. In my 2D simulation I assumed asymptotic boundary conditions. What do you reccomended? Reading the Maxwell's user guide, I had thought about using a vacuum box to limit the region of simulation. I'm having some difficulties to represent the field distribution, too. The results are strange, at least for me. I also tried to represent the field's intensity (relatively to a plane) on a graph, but there's no way to do it. I think I'm doing something wrong. Could anyone give me an hand?

    I trust in your help guys. I'd be very grateful.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 16, 2010 #2
    So guys, I've solved all my problems, except one: who know how to use the "3D rectangular plot" in Maxwell's reports? I need to represent the magnetic field's intensity in a 3D graph. Thanks for any advices.
     
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