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Magnetism due to electron spin

  1. Jan 12, 2013 #1
    hi
    i have a doubt about magnetism
    i am assuming that magnetism is caused by spinning electric flux
    if we change the velocity(voltage) of the electron does the spin increase?
    how can we calculate spin of the electron
    which forces are responsible for electron spin
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 12, 2013 #2

    Drakkith

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    Staff: Mentor

    Voltage is a difference of electric potential between two points. You cannot change the voltage of a single particle because it cannot have a voltage to begin with. Nor can you change the spin of a particle. Spin is an intrinsic property of a particle, much like mass and charge are, and it cannot be changed at all. There is no force responsible for this spin. It simply exists as a fundamental property of particles.
     
  4. Jan 13, 2013 #3
    sorry its not voltage
    its W.D by the electron
    my doubt is that will the spin increase if the electron is accelerated
     
  5. Jan 13, 2013 #4

    Drakkith

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    Staff: Mentor

    No the spin of the electron will not change if accelerated. As I explained before it is an intrinsic property that cannot be changed.
     
  6. Jan 13, 2013 #5
    what is the actual rate of spin???
     
  7. Jan 13, 2013 #6

    Drakkith

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    Staff: Mentor

    The electron is not actually spinning around an axis. It is intrinsic angular momentum. You can think of it as being "built in" angular momentum. At the quantum scale things do not appear to work as they do at the classical scale. A basketball spinning on someones finger has angular momentum from the rotation, and it is actually spinning around an axis of rotation. Particle spin is NOT like that. I like to think of it as the most basic form of angular momentum, something that can only be replicated in a poor way at the normal everyday scale of things.

    Per wiki:

    In quantum mechanics and particle physics, spin is an intrinsic form of angular momentum carried by elementary particles, composite particles (hadrons), and atomic nuclei.[1][2] Spin is a solely quantum-mechanical phenomenon; it does not have a counterpart in classical mechanics (despite the term spin being reminiscent of classical phenomena such as a planet spinning on its axis).[2]


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spin_(physics)

    I find this similar to charge. I can take an electrode and charge it to almost any amount of positive or negative charge. From this one might think that charge can be increased either way to any amount. However when we look at the basic building blocks of matter we see that charge is also a built in property of particles, and that they reason I am charging my electrode is because I am moving charged particles off of or on to the electrode. Of course that's just my way of looking at.
     
  8. Jan 14, 2013 #7
    thanks drakkit
     
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