Magnification at a Different Distance from Mirror?

In summary, the focal length between a person and their mirror is 0.36 m, producing a magnification of 1.50 when their face is 12.0 cm away. When the person moves to a distance of 3.7 times the focal length, the magnification is -0.62, but it is unclear what the variables and images are in this scenario.
  • #1
DaveMann
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Homework Statement


The focal length between a person and his mirror that produces a magnification of 1.50 when his face is 12.0 cm away is 0.36 m. He then moves to a distance of 3.7 times the focal length away from her mirror. What is the magnification now?

Homework Equations


di/do=m
1/f=1/di+1/do

The Attempt at a Solution


I've been trying to work this out on paper for the last hour. When his distance is 2.6 times the focal length, the magnification is -0.62. I can't figure out why that is though. There seems to be 2 variables.
 
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  • #2
The images can be real and virtual. One image is upside down, which one? What is the sign of magnification in case of a real image and in case of a virtual image?
 

Related to Magnification at a Different Distance from Mirror?

1. What is the "Impossible Reflection Problem"?

The "Impossible Reflection Problem" is a thought experiment in physics that explores the concept of perfect reflection. It poses the question of whether it is possible for an object to have a reflection that is completely identical to itself, but reversed in time.

2. Who first proposed the "Impossible Reflection Problem"?

The "Impossible Reflection Problem" was first proposed by the physicist and philosopher Ernst Mach in the late 19th century. He used it as an example to challenge the concept of absolute time and space in Newtonian mechanics.

3. Is the "Impossible Reflection Problem" still relevant in modern physics?

Yes, the "Impossible Reflection Problem" is still relevant in modern physics as it raises questions about the nature of time and the possibility of perfect reflection. It has also been used to explore concepts such as entropy and the arrow of time.

4. What are some proposed solutions to the "Impossible Reflection Problem"?

One proposed solution is the idea of a "mirror world," where time is reversed and objects have perfect reflections of themselves. Another solution is the concept of a "block universe" where time is a static dimension and all events, including reflections, exist simultaneously.

5. Can the "Impossible Reflection Problem" be tested in real life?

Currently, there is no way to test the "Impossible Reflection Problem" in real life as it deals with theoretical concepts. However, scientists have conducted experiments with mirrors and light to simulate perfect reflection and study the behavior of time-reversed systems.

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