Mathematical problem is classical question

In summary, when 2as is negative that means the body is slowing down. But a negative value of 2as cannot have a magnitude greater than u²--once the body slows to zero it must reverse direction. When 2as is negative that means the body is slowing down. But a negative value of 2as cannot have a magnitude greater than u²--once the body slows to zero it must reverse direction.
  • #1
dE_logics
742
0
From the formula 2as = v2 - u2

I made v the subject...and it becomes -

(2as+u2)1/2 = v


Problem is real world value of 2as is negative...as a result it makes a complex answer...but actually its not; instead the value of v should also come negative.

Here a, u are negative...and a force applies on the body in the same direction as u, which is negative, as a result a negative a cause of that very force.

So the v should also be real and negative...but its coming as complex :confused:

Say...can I take the a and u to be positive initially and add the negative sign to the result...sounds ok to me.
 
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  • #2
[tex]v=\pm \sqrt{2as+u^2}[/tex]
 
  • #3
dE_logics said:
Here a, u are negative...and a force applies on the body in the same direction as u, which is negative, as a result a negative a cause of that very force.

How about the sign of s?
 
  • #4
Yeah its too negative.

But that way the value that comes by is positive, but it should be negative.
 
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  • #5
dE_logics said:
Yeah its too negative.

But that way the value that comes by is positive, but it should be negative.

See Phrak's response
 
  • #6
dE_logics said:
From the formula 2as = v2 - u2

I made v the subject...and it becomes -

(2as+u2)1/2 = vProblem is real world value of 2as is negative...as a result it makes a complex answer...but actually its not; instead the value of v should also come negative.

Here a, u are negative...and a force applies on the body in the same direction as u, which is negative, as a result a negative a cause of that very force.

So the v should also be real and negative...but its coming as complex :confused:

Say...can I take the a and u to be positive initially and add the negative sign to the result...sounds ok to me.

Show this explicitly in a specific problem and we will show you where you forgot another sign somewhere. Both Phrak and atyy have given you sufficient hints.

Zz.
 
  • #7
dE_logics said:
Problem is real world value of 2as is negative...as a result it makes a complex answer...
When 2as is negative that means the body is slowing down. But a negative value of 2as cannot have a magnitude greater than u²--once the body slows to zero it must reverse direction.
 
  • #8
Doc Al said:
When 2as is negative that means the body is slowing down. But a negative value of 2as cannot have a magnitude greater than u²--once the body slows to zero it must reverse direction.

It is accelerating, but all the coordinates are negative, I mean...the u, a and s are all negative.
 
  • #9
davieddy said:
See Phrak's response

ZapperZ said:
Show this explicitly in a specific problem and we will show you where you forgot another sign somewhere. Both Phrak and atyy have given you sufficient hints.

Zz.

Ok then...both negative and positive results will be valid?...I mean...that's true when a value is squared.
 
  • #10
dE_logics said:
It is accelerating, but all the coordinates are negative, I mean...the u, a and s are all negative.
So then what is the issue? 2as is positive, thus v² = u² + 2as is positive. No complex answers required.

(Realize that this equation only gives you the magnitude of v; the sign is up to you.)
 

Related to Mathematical problem is classical question

1. What is a mathematical problem?

A mathematical problem is a question or statement that requires the use of mathematical principles, theories, and techniques to find a solution or prove a theorem.

2. What makes a problem a "classical" one?

A classical mathematical problem is one that has been studied and attempted by mathematicians for many years, and has stood the test of time as a challenging and important problem in the field.

3. How do mathematicians approach solving a classical problem?

Mathematicians use a combination of logical reasoning, creativity, and mathematical knowledge to approach and attempt to solve a classical problem. They may also draw inspiration from previous approaches and techniques used by other mathematicians.

4. Is there a definitive solution to a classical mathematical problem?

Not always. Some classical problems have been solved and proven, while others remain unsolved and are still being worked on by mathematicians. Even when a solution is found, it may be subject to debate and further refinement.

5. What is the significance of studying classical mathematical problems?

Studying classical mathematical problems not only helps to advance the field of mathematics, but also allows for the development of new techniques and theories that can be applied to other problems. It also allows for a deeper understanding and appreciation of the beauty and complexity of mathematics.

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