Measure the acceleration due to gravity on a distant planet

In summary, an astronaut measures the acceleration due to gravity on a distant planet by hanging a 0.055 kg ball from the end of a wire with a length of 0.95 m and a linear density of 1.2*10^-4 kg/m. Using electronic equipment, the astronaut measures the time for a transverse pulse to travel the length of the wire and obtains a value of 0.016 s. From this, the velocity of the pulse is calculated to be 59.38 m/s and the acceleration due to gravity is determined to be 7.69 m/s^2.
  • #1
rayhan619
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0

Homework Statement



To measure the acceleration due to gravity on a distant planet, an astronut hangs a 0.055 kg ball from the end of a wire. the wire has a length of 0.95 n and a linear density of 1.2*10
^-14 kg/m. using electronic equipment, the astronaut measures the time for a transverse pulse to travel the length of the wire and obtains a value of 0.016 s. the mass of the wire is negligible compared to the mass of the ball.
a) draw a nice picture
b) calculate the velocity of the pulse
c)determine the acceleration due to gravity

Homework Equations



f = v/2L
v = (Mg/mu)^sq. root

The Attempt at a Solution



m = 0.055 kg
L = 0.95 m
mu = 1.2*10^-4 kg/m
T = 0.016 s

b)f = 1/0.016s = 62.5 hz
v = 2fL = 2*62.5 hz*0.95 m = 118.75 m/s

c)g = (v^2*mu)/M = {(118.75 m/s)^2*1.2*10^-4 kg/m}/0.055 kg = 30.77 m/s^2

i got both of them wrong. where did i screw up?
 
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  • #2
rayhan619 said:
b)f = 1/0.016s = 62.5 hz
v = 2fL = 2*62.5 hz*0.95 m = 118.75 m/s
This is a pulse, not a standing wave. The speed of the pulse is simply distance/time.
 
  • #3
a) i have attached the picture to check it.

so for b) v = L/t = 0.95 m/ 0.016 s = 59.38 ms^-1

and c) g = {(59.38 m/s)^2 * 1.2*10^-4 kg/m}/ 0.055 kg = 7.69 m?s^2.

right?
 

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  • #4
Looks good to me.
 
  • #5
appreciate it man
 

Related to Measure the acceleration due to gravity on a distant planet

1. What is the formula for calculating acceleration due to gravity on a distant planet?

The formula for calculating acceleration due to gravity on a distant planet is: a = G (m1 + m2) / d2, where a is the acceleration due to gravity, G is the universal gravitational constant, m1 and m2 are the masses of the planet and the object, and d is the distance between the planet and the object.

2. How do you measure the distance between the planet and the object?

The distance between the planet and the object can be measured using a variety of methods, such as radar or laser ranging, optical interferometry, or parallax measurements.

3. How does the mass of the planet affect the acceleration due to gravity?

The mass of the planet does not affect the acceleration due to gravity on a distant planet. The acceleration due to gravity is solely determined by the mass of the object and the distance between the object and the planet.

4. Can the acceleration due to gravity on a distant planet be negative?

Yes, the acceleration due to gravity on a distant planet can be negative. This would mean that the object is experiencing a force pulling it away from the planet, rather than towards it.

5. How does the acceleration due to gravity on a distant planet compare to that on Earth?

The acceleration due to gravity on a distant planet can vary greatly depending on the mass and size of the planet. On average, it is expected to be lower than on Earth since most planets are larger and have a lower density compared to Earth. However, it is possible for a distant planet to have a higher acceleration due to gravity than Earth if it has a higher mass or is more compact.

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