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Men: can you knit and sew?

  1. Jan 19, 2008 #1
    I can knit and sew.There was a time when lots of men and women could do both because people didn't have the money to buy clothes and throw away damaged ones.But can you knit and sew? If someone said "pearl one plain one" would you know they weren't talking about jewellery and aircraft?!
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2008
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  3. Jan 19, 2008 #2

    BobG

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    I can operate a sewing machine, plus make minor sewing repairs by hand.

    I wouldn't say I have enough skill to make an outfit, since that requires being able to lay out your material, cut it, etc (I have made stuffed animals for my kids, but I've always made sure the difficulty level of the pattern was easy).
     
  4. Jan 19, 2008 #3

    Astronuc

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    I used to help my grandmother, who made sweaters for us, and my mom when they did knitting.

    I can certainly sew - which is useful in reattaching buttons, repair minor tears in clothing, and extending the life of clothing. My mom taught me that too.
     
  5. Jan 19, 2008 #4

    wolram

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    Sailor were renowned for it as i am a land lubber i have no clue as to how people do it.
     
  6. Jan 19, 2008 #5
    I thought this is why I got married, so I didn't have to?
     
  7. Jan 19, 2008 #6

    turbo

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    When I was a kid, my mother knitted, and she showed me the basics. I started using up all the little left-over balls of yarn from other projects to crank out multi-colored scarves. If you asked me to knit something now, I wouldn't have a clew.:wink:
     
  8. Jan 19, 2008 #7

    wolram

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    More marvelous is people that crochet, getting a pattern and not even looking at what they are doing, some of the design es i have seen are gob smacking.
     
  9. Jan 19, 2008 #8
    I actually knew how to crochet once upon a time, but I've since forgotten everything I knew on the subject.
     
  10. Jan 19, 2008 #9

    arildno

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    No, nor can I do any embroidery, either. Or decorate interiors for that matter.
     
  11. Jan 19, 2008 #10

    turbo

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    My mother could crochet beautifully, and she made doilies, shawls, blankets, and decorative throws that way. She crocheted colored cord very tightly to make baskets, too. Some of the nicest Christmas gifts my wife and I got from her were hand-made.
     
  12. Jan 19, 2008 #11

    wolram

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    I bet you are better than most.
     
  13. Jan 19, 2008 #12
    I can do a half ass sew job, but no knitting
     
  14. Jan 19, 2008 #13

    wolram

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    Roll on the none metalic staple they are so much a pain in the ass.
     
  15. Jan 19, 2008 #14

    EnumaElish

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    I can sew but rarely do.

    I learned how to knit (no intricate patterns though); I haven't for years.
     
  16. Jan 19, 2008 #15

    Moonbear

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    Knitting is over-rated. I don't think anyone would judge anyone else on whether they could knit in this day and age. But, I do think EVERYONE should know some simple sewing, like how to sew a button back on or to repair a broken seam or falling cuff, or patch up head wounds :uhh:...okay, strike that last one. None of this is difficult, and it's silly for someone to be paying to have buttons sewn on when it requires almost no skill at all (really, how hard is it to stick a needle through fabric and tie a knot when you're done?) I'm not too concerned with someone being able to patch ripped clothing, because if it's that damaged, it should just be thrown out. It's a bonus if you can hem your own pants, but sometimes better to hire someone to do that since it's also easy to measure wrong when you don't have someone to help. Being someone who knows how to sew sufficiently to hem clothing, I would be appreciative of a man who simply knows enough to put the pins in the right places when I need to hem my own clothing (it takes me forever to get it right since of course the hemline lifts when you bend over to pin it, so I have to put in the pins, stand up straight in front of a mirror, check how far off they are, readjust, etc.)
     
  17. Jan 19, 2008 #16

    OmCheeto

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    Mommy taught me how to knit and crochet during some long Alaska winters.
    And sewing machines? It's just like driving a car. Fill up your two spools of thread, figure out where you want to go, and floor that sucker.

    Bzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz!
     
  18. Jan 19, 2008 #17

    wolram

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    MoonB, Hem line adjust, shut up me.
     
  19. Jan 19, 2008 #18

    Moonbear

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    :rofl: :blushing: Hmm...maybe that's a good pick-up line: "Hey there, can you adjust my hemline for me?" :rofl: *cough* *sputter*
     
  20. Jan 19, 2008 #19

    Moonbear

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    I think that's what gives people the biggest problem with using a sewing machine...if you go slow, you're more likely to be wobbly, but when just learning, you're afraid to "floor it" as you put it. If you just go for it, it's so much easier to sew a straight line (unless you're using my grandmother's old sewing machine, which I think is powered by a jet engine, and will jam a sewing needle down to the bone if you go too fast :surprised ...she was a seamstress by profession and had an industrial sewing machine given to her when she retired...by the look of it, I'm sure it's because they were retiring the sewing machine too...the motor isn't even housed within the sewing machine itself, but a separate motor with belts driving the sewing machine...scary beast!)
     
  21. Jan 19, 2008 #20

    turbo

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    You should hear/see the sewing machines in a shoe-shop. They are powerful and FAST and very loud. There's a lot of force involved in sewing leather, plastic, foam, etc, and those needles get REALLY hot. Good eye protection is mandatory, because when those needles break you don't want pieces embedded in your eye.

    I can operate a sewing machine and could since I was a kid. When I was about 10 or so, my mother got a very complex Kenmore machine that came with a collection of plastic cams and metal guides to move the needle and fabric around to do buttonholes and decorative stitches. She was a talented seamstress, but was not good with machinery, so every time she needed that machine to do something complex, I'd set it up for her and test it.
     
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