Modern Physics Text: Any suggestions?

In summary, people seem to like either Eisberg/Resnick or Tipler. I think I'll go with Eisberg/Resnick. Thanks for the input!
  • #1
Saladsamurai
3,020
7
If this is not the appropriate forum, I apologize. I just assume it is the forum where the people reading this will have the most insight on the matter.

I am looking to purchase a modern physics text to study at my own pace. I have a fairly good understanding of calculus and ordinary differential equations along with classical physics (at least to the extent that I have completed these courses at my college).

So far the only recommendation I have gotten has been Serway's Modern Physics. I have read some good reviews on it and also some terrible ones. In said terrible reviews, the name Tipler has come up as an alternative a few times.

Anyone have any suggestions?

Thanks for your time
 
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  • #2
Modern physics is such a strange term, but I guess well recognized. Take a look at Eisberg & Resnick's Quantum Physics book. Might be good for you, might not.
 
  • #3
Sweet. Moved to the forum that absolutely nobody looks in.

Resnick looks pretty good for me. I liked his text on classical.

Any others?
 
  • #4
Saladsamurai said:
Resnick looks pretty good for me. I liked his text on classical.

It's between this and Griffith's...
 
  • #5
Saladsamurai said:
It's between this and Griffith's...

Anyone else before I buy Resnick?
 
  • #6
We used Tipler in my class. The first couple chapters were decent, but it was all downhill from there. pretty awful book; go with Resnick.
 
  • #7
  • #8
People have mixed feelings about Resnick. What do you want to learn? There's modern physics for people who might not go on to proper quantum mechanics, relativity, etc. For those I might recommend another book.

Try getting a copy from the library before you shell out money. People have mixed feelings about Eisberg/Resnick. I think it is a good book for what it aims to do, but there are people who try to pass senior QM using it, and that is not such a good idea. That said, I think it's a good deal.
 
  • #9
Saladsamurai said:
If this is not the appropriate forum, I apologize. I just assume it is the forum where the people reading this will have the most insight on the matter.

I am looking to purchase a modern physics text to study at my own pace. I have a fairly good understanding of calculus and ordinary differential equations along with classical physics (at least to the extent that I have completed these courses at my college).

So far the only recommendation I have gotten has been Serway's Modern Physics. I have read some good reviews on it and also some terrible ones. In said terrible reviews, the name Tipler has come up as an alternative a few times.

Anyone have any suggestions?

Thanks for your time


I absolutely loved Eisberg and Resnick when I was an undergraduate. They take the time to explain the phyiscs and the math level is fairly basic, making it very good for self-study.

But liking a book is extremely subjective. What you should definitely do is to go to a university library and get the book. If you can't borrow it, just go sit and spend a few hours reading it. Then you will see if that's a good fit for you.
 
  • #10
nrqed said:
I absolutely loved Eisberg and Resnick when I was an undergraduate. They take the time to explain the phyiscs and the math level is fairly basic, making it very good for self-study.

But liking a book is extremely subjective. What you should definitely do is to go to a university library and get the book. If you can't borrow it, just go sit and spend a few hours reading it. Then you will see if that's a good fit for you.

You're right, this is too subjective a question. Just like all of the reviews at Amazon, everyone in this thread has different complaints and compliments on the same books.

I really liked Resnick's text on classical, so I think I will go with that.

Thanks folks
 

1. What is modern physics?

Modern physics is a branch of physics that deals with the study of the physical world beyond classical mechanics. It includes the study of quantum mechanics, relativity, and other advanced topics.

2. How is modern physics different from classical physics?

Modern physics differs from classical physics in that it takes into account the principles of quantum mechanics and relativity, which explain the behavior of particles on a microscopic and cosmic scale, respectively. Classical physics, on the other hand, is based on Newton's laws of motion and describes the behavior of objects on a macroscopic scale.

3. What are some key concepts in modern physics?

Some key concepts in modern physics include quantum mechanics, relativity, particle physics, cosmology, and the study of fundamental forces such as electromagnetism and gravity.

4. What are some practical applications of modern physics?

Modern physics has numerous practical applications, including the development of technologies such as lasers, transistors, and nuclear power. It also helps us understand and predict the behavior of subatomic particles and the structure of the universe.

5. How can I improve my understanding of modern physics?

To improve your understanding of modern physics, it is important to have a strong foundation in classical physics and mathematics. It is also helpful to stay updated on new discoveries and theories through reading scientific journals and attending lectures or conferences. Practice solving problems and discussing concepts with others can also enhance your understanding.

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