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More Things in the Sky

  1. Jun 18, 2006 #1

    Gokul43201

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    More "Things in the Sky"

    RULES:
    1. Each person may attempt to answer only 1 question. If there are unanswered questions in say, two days, I'll announce a free-for-all, whence everyone may go for all the remaining ones.

    2. You may Google all but the last question. Some of the questions are mildly Google-proof; the last one is positively Google friendly.

    3. No need for invisible ink.

    4. First person to break rule #1 gets to wear the PF dunce hat.

    THE QUESTIONS:

    1. This heavenly body - the first of its kind to be discovered - was named after a Roman Goddess that is said to have secretly gotten cozy with Jupiter. Name it.

    2. This nearly 3,000-mile wide dark band separates A and B. What is the band called?

    3. A distance from planetary center of about 1.2 times the planet's diameter is a dangerous place for its moon to get to. What is this critical distance called?

    4. This Astronomer Royal was rightfully a broad-shouldered giant, but would probably have wanted no part of that association. Who?

    5. Easy one. Complete the missing parts of the sequence : O _ A _ G _ M
    And for a bonus point, throw in the missing members of the lesser known series W _ _ C _ D

    6. I've been told that Hell is actually located at about 32S 8W and is only 20 miles across. If I started from say, Orlando, Florida (USA), roughly how far will I have to travel before I can proclaim that I'm in Hell?

    7. This amateur British astronomer who discovered 5 comets and 5 novae died recently. The secret to his success was simple, and simply amazing! He had memorized the positions and patterns of thousands upon thousands of celestial objects. When something came along that wasn't in his head, there was a reasonably good chance that it hadn't been discovered yet.

    Who is this astronomical wizard who did what no one could have imagined possible under cloudy British skies?

    8. Fill in the missing pair of words:
    That errant gang
    And their ___ ___
    Why aid them and abet them?
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2006
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 18, 2006 #2

    George Jones

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    I'll take a shot at this without Google.

    Roche limit.
     
  4. Jun 18, 2006 #3

    Astronuc

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    Cassini Division in Saturn's Rings.

    Moons within the Roche limit are pulled apart by tidal forces due to the gravity field of the larger planetary mass.

    The first sequence in #5 is easy. And the second one is also fairly straight forward. A really bright person should get them in a twinkle.

    #7 He was 88 and had memorised the positions and brightnesses of over 30,000 stars.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2006
  5. Jun 18, 2006 #4

    Gokul43201

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    Correct, George and Astro.

    Two down; six to go.
     
  6. Jun 18, 2006 #5

    DaveC426913

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    #5. WOBAFGKMRNS.

    I memorized this in grade school. It's easy to remember when you make it like a rhyme:

    WOB
    AFG
    KMRNS.
     
  7. Jun 18, 2006 #6

    George Jones

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    One of the standard ways to remember OBAFGKMRNS is

    Oh Be A Fine Girl/Guy, Kiss Me Right Now Smack.
     
  8. Jun 18, 2006 #7

    Gokul43201

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    Yeah, I only knew the kissing mnemonic! And it didn't have RNS in it - I learned those separately, as part of WLTC(RN)SD.

    With Dave's answer, that's 3 questions down.

    Still standing : 1, 4, 6, 7, 8
     
  9. Jun 18, 2006 #8

    Moonbear

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    I'll give it a try, but I think it's a Greek name, not a Roman name I came up with for #1 (but maybe that's the google-proofing).

    #1: Io

    If Jupiter had been a tad less promiscuous, that might be an easier question!
     
  10. Jun 19, 2006 #9

    NoTime

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    Last I heard Hell was in Michigan.
    Somewhat over 1000mi from Orlando.
     
  11. Jun 19, 2006 #10
    Ok, here's a guess for #8

    That errant gang
    And their Big Bang :biggrin:
    Why aid them and abet them?
     
  12. Jun 19, 2006 #11
    7 George Alcock
     
  13. Jun 19, 2006 #12

    Math Is Hard

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    #4
    I'll go with John Flamsteed. Not a happy camper.
     
  14. Jun 19, 2006 #13

    Astronuc

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    The second mnemonic applies to "Spectral types for rare stars" with W for Wolf-Rayet stars.

    I learned the first mnemonic as OBAFGKMRNS, but apparently it has been separated into two sets, OBAFGKM and WLTCSD, where C = R,N.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stellar_Classification
     
  15. Jun 19, 2006 #14

    Gokul43201

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    Sorry Moonie, that's not it. And yes, I tried to make it so that if you did want to use Google, it would take some effort - this particular one was hard.

    But here a hint for y'all : The mythological bit in the question is actually an astronomical clue as well (and may well be why the name was chosen).
     
  16. Jun 19, 2006 #15

    Gokul43201

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    No, notime. That ain't it - for one thing, the co-ordinates don't match.
     
  17. Jun 19, 2006 #16

    Gokul43201

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    Correct.

    This is from a poem written by George Gamow's wife, caricaturing the hot debate between the Big Bang folk (Gamow, Lemaitre, Ryle, Hewish) and the Steady State folk (Bondi, Gold, Hoyle) way back in the 50s.

    Since the poem is found all over the internet, I trust there are no copyright issues with posting it here in its entirety.

     
  18. Jun 19, 2006 #17

    Integral

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    1. Venus..
     
  19. Jun 19, 2006 #18

    Gokul43201

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    Correct.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/1081747.stm

    Correct. The "broad-shouldered giant" reference was a hint to the connection with Newton. In fact, it was most of Flamsteed's very careful measurements of lunar trajectories that Newton used in his unification of terrestrial gravity with celestial gravity.

    And then there's this (from the wiki on Flamsteed):
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Flamsteed

    Integral: No it's not Venus.
     
  20. Jun 19, 2006 #19

    DaveC426913

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    6. That's the last known location of the fabled Spidermonkey Island. Has it been renamed? :biggrin:
     
  21. Jun 19, 2006 #20

    dav2008

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    Andromeda.
     
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