Newton's 2nd law question -- pushing a block up an inclined ramp....

In summary, if a constant force is applied to an object and the force is pushing the object up a inclined ramp with constant velocity, the acceleration is 1m/s^2.
  • #1
J-dizzal
394
6
If a constant force is applied to an object and the force is pushing the object up a inclined ramp with constant velocity what is the acceleration if mass is unknown?
F=ma
F=m (1m/s^2)​
If i apply this equation then acceleration is 1m/s^2. Am i applying this formula correctly? thanks
 
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  • #2
J-dizzal said:
the force is pushing the object up a inclined ramp with constant velocity

If the velocity is constant then what does that tell you about the acceleration?
 
  • #3
Nugatory said:
If the velocity is constant then what does that tell you about the acceleration?
i want to say if v is constant than acceleration is zero. but when i plug that into F=ma i got F=m0 which is zero force, but that doesn't work. and this is why I am confused
 
  • #4
J-dizzal said:
i want to say if v is constant than acceleration is zero. but when i plug that into F=ma i got F=m0 which is zero force, but that doesn't work. and this is why I am confused
because of the zero product property of multiplication
 
  • #5
You're on the right track here - the acceleration is zero and therefore the net force is zero.

However, that zero net force is the sum of all the forces that are at play here, including gravity, friction, and the force being used to push the object up the ramp.
 
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  • #6
J-dizzal said:
i want to say if v is constant than acceleration is zero. but when i plug that into F=ma i got F=m0 which is zero force, but that doesn't work. and this is why I am confused
If you think of Newton's 2nd law as ##\Sigma F = ma## (instead of just F = ma), that will remind you that it is the net force that equals ma.
 
  • #7
Newton's second law is a way of saying, if you apply a force on a mass it will accelerate, F = ma describes the way it accelerate, you can see that the force F and acceleration a have the same direction, a = F/m mean that if if you apply a force on a very massive object it wil accelerate less than it would if you apply the same force on light object, in your case the object is moving at a constant velocity, so It isn't acceleration so the net force is zero as F = m*0 suggest, it's weight is pushing downward and the constant force you apply will cancel it but pushing upwards, good luck :p
 
  • #8
Doc Al said:
If you think of Newton's 2nd law as ##\Sigma F = ma## (instead of just F = ma), that will remind you that it is the net force that equals ma.
yes i forgot about the sigma there. so in the example of an object on an inclined plane there would be a contact force applied to it, but when applying F=ma i must also add in the force that is parallel to the plane from its weight and frictional forces if they apply. F=ma would be ma=Fapplied-Fgravity-Ffriction, then can solve further for acceleration.
thanks!
 

Related to Newton's 2nd law question -- pushing a block up an inclined ramp....

1. What is Newton's 2nd law?

Newton's 2nd law, also known as the law of acceleration, states that the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on it and inversely proportional to its mass. In other words, the larger the force applied to an object, the greater its acceleration will be, and the more massive an object is, the slower its acceleration will be.

2. How does this law apply to pushing a block up an inclined ramp?

In this scenario, the force of gravity is pulling the block down the ramp, while the force applied by the person pushing the block is acting in the opposite direction. According to Newton's 2nd law, the net force on the block will determine its acceleration. If the force of the person pushing is greater than the force of gravity, the block will accelerate up the ramp. If the force of gravity is greater, the block will accelerate down the ramp.

3. Does the mass of the block affect its acceleration up the ramp?

Yes, according to Newton's 2nd law, the mass of the block will affect its acceleration. The more massive the block is, the slower its acceleration will be, even if the same amount of force is applied to it. This is because the mass is inversely proportional to acceleration.

4. What other factors can affect the acceleration of the block up the ramp?

The coefficient of friction between the block and the ramp can also affect the acceleration of the block. If there is a higher coefficient of friction, it will require more force to push the block up the ramp, resulting in a slower acceleration. Other factors such as the angle of the ramp and the strength of the person pushing the block can also affect its acceleration.

5. How can I calculate the acceleration of the block up the ramp using Newton's 2nd law?

To calculate the acceleration of the block, you will need to know the net force acting on the block and its mass. The formula for Newton's 2nd law is F=ma, where F is the net force, m is the mass, and a is the acceleration. Once you have these values, you can plug them into the formula to calculate the acceleration of the block up the ramp.

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