NEWTON's laws of motion

In summary, Newton's 3 laws of motion are: 1. A body will remain at rest or in motion unless acted upon by an outside force. 2. The relationship between mass, acceleration, and force is F = ma. 3. For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. Examples include a ball moving at a constant velocity until a force is applied, a ball of mass 2 Kg with an acceleration of 5 ms being acted upon by a force of 10 N, and a wall exerting an equal force back when a force is applied to it. These are simplified versions of the laws.
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hello can some one help me, post a simplified version of Newton's 3 laws of motion and some examples thank you very much :)
 
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  • #2
Hey Doc.Madani :smile:

1. A physical body will remain at rest, or continue to move at a constant velocity, unless an outside net force acts upon it.

Imagine a ball moving through space at a constant velocity, until a force act on that ball it will continue to move with that constant velocity.

2. The relationship between an object's mass m, its acceleration a, and the applied force F is F = ma.

I am sure you have used examples using F = ma. Say a ball of mass 2 Kg is moving with an acceleration of 5 ms. The force exerted on the ball is 10 N.

3. To every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

If you exert a force on a wall of 10 N and the wall doesn't move, it is exerting a force of 10 N back.


Somebody might want to touch up on these, if there are any small problems. Those are not the actual laws, but watered down versions.

_Mayday_
 
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Sure, I'd be happy to help! Newton's laws of motion are three fundamental principles that describe how objects move in the physical world. They were developed by Sir Isaac Newton in the 17th century and are still widely used today in modern physics.

Here is a simplified version of Newton's three laws:

1. Law of Inertia: This law states that an object at rest will remain at rest and an object in motion will remain in motion at a constant speed and direction unless acted upon by an external force. In other words, objects tend to resist changes in their motion.

Example: If you push a book on a table, it will continue to slide until it is stopped by friction or another force.

2. Law of Force and Acceleration: This law states that the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on it and inversely proportional to its mass. In simpler terms, the greater the force applied to an object, the greater its acceleration will be. And the heavier the object, the smaller its acceleration will be for the same amount of force.

Example: If you push a shopping cart with the same force as a car, the car will accelerate more because it has a greater mass.

3. Law of Action and Reaction: This law states that for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. In other words, when one object exerts a force on another object, the second object will exert an equal and opposite force back on the first object.

Example: When a person jumps off a boat, the boat will move in the opposite direction due to the force of the person's jump.

I hope this helps to simplify and clarify Newton's three laws of motion for you. They are essential principles for understanding how objects move in our world and have many practical applications in fields such as engineering, physics, and even sports.
 

What are Newton's three laws of motion?

Newton's first law of motion, also known as the law of inertia, states that an object at rest will remain at rest and an object in motion will remain in motion with a constant velocity unless acted upon by an external force. Newton's second law of motion states that the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on it and inversely proportional to its mass. Newton's third law of motion states that for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.

How do Newton's laws of motion apply to everyday life?

Newton's laws of motion can be observed in everyday life, such as when a ball rolls down a hill (first law), a car accelerates when the gas pedal is pressed (second law), and a rocket launches off the ground (third law).

What is the difference between mass and weight according to Newton's laws of motion?

Mass is a measure of the amount of matter in an object, while weight is a measure of the force of gravity acting on an object. According to Newton's second law of motion, an object's mass affects its acceleration, while its weight affects the force needed to accelerate it.

How did Newton's laws of motion revolutionize the field of physics?

Before Newton's laws of motion, the prevailing belief was that objects needed a continuous force to remain in motion. However, Newton's laws explained that objects in motion will remain in motion unless acted upon by an external force, revolutionizing the understanding of motion and providing a foundation for modern physics.

What are the limitations of Newton's laws of motion?

While Newton's laws of motion provide a good approximation for most everyday situations, they do not hold true in extreme conditions such as at the speed of light or in the presence of strong gravitational fields. These situations require the use of more advanced theories such as Einstein's theory of relativity.

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