NuScale Modular Reactor gets NRC certification

In summary, NuScale Power, a startup company, has received NRC certification for their modular reactor design of 50 MW, allowing utilities to use this design in their power plant applications. The modular concept could potentially reduce the cost of nuclear power plants through production scale and standardization, but it is still too early to tell. The modules can be added over time, allowing for flexibility in plant size. One potential benefit is a smaller Emergency Planning Zone, but the issue of co-located units has been raised. Many single unit nuclear plants have shut down in recent years, with existing units being sold to larger utilities.
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gleem

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NuScale Power a startup company whose product is a modular reactor of 50 MW has received NRC certification so utilities can reference this reactor in their application to build a power plant using this design.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/t...A16zG60?cvid=aea9bfdb3d5c4073b75f973c2004c008

The question remains can this modular concept reduce the cost of nuclear power plants by production scale and standardization of installations?
 
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gleem said:
NuScale Power a startup company whose product is a modular reactor of 50 MW has received NRC certification so utilities can reference this reactor in their application to build a power plant using this design.
Each module produces 50 MWe, and so plants could be designed for 600 MWe (12 modular units), or larger.

gleem said:
The question remains can this modular concept reduce the cost of nuclear power plants by production scale and standardization of installations?
Too early to tell. In theory, one can get up one or two modules very quickly, and add over time.

One could build a small 100 MWe plant (2 modules), 200 MWe (4 modules), and so on. I don't know what the installation process looks like yet. For example, can existing modules operate during installation of the new units?

One supposed benefit of the NuScale modular plant is the smaller Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ), since the modules in theory were accident-resistant or accident toleration (I don't really know where they are with that). However, the Fukushima accident raised issues of co-located units, which is an issue for multi unit plants.
NRC Ref for EPZ: https://www.nrc.gov/about-nrc/emerg-preparedness/about-emerg-preparedness/planning-zones.html

Over the past three or so decades, most single unit nuclear plants (NPPs) have shutdown. Those existing single units have been sold off to larger utilities like Exelon and Entergy.
 

1. What is the NuScale Modular Reactor?

The NuScale Modular Reactor is a small, modular nuclear reactor designed by NuScale Power. It is a pressurized water reactor that uses natural circulation to generate electricity.

2. What does it mean to receive NRC certification?

NRC certification means that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has reviewed and approved the design of the NuScale Modular Reactor, stating that it meets all safety and security requirements.

3. How does the NuScale Modular Reactor differ from traditional nuclear reactors?

The NuScale Modular Reactor is significantly smaller and more flexible than traditional nuclear reactors. It is also designed to shut down automatically and safely in the event of a power interruption, without the need for human intervention.

4. What are the benefits of the NuScale Modular Reactor?

The NuScale Modular Reactor offers several benefits, including increased safety, lower cost, and more flexibility in terms of location and power output. It also produces less waste and has a shorter construction timeline compared to traditional nuclear reactors.

5. When will the NuScale Modular Reactor be available for use?

The NuScale Modular Reactor is expected to be commercially available in the mid-2020s. However, the first plant using this technology is currently under construction in Idaho and is expected to be operational by the late 2020s.

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