Optimal Distance for Collision-Free Earth Orbit

In summary, the conversation is discussing the altitude needed for an object to be in order to avoid collisions with man-made objects while in a relatively circular Earth orbit. The person is wondering about the altitudes used for various low-Earth orbits and the altitude used by geosynchronous satellites, specifically at 26,000 miles. They are also questioning how far above Earth an object would need to be to have a low likelihood of colliding with objects in low Earth orbit and above, as they believe that once an object is out of low Earth orbit, it has passed most of the debris.
  • #1
keepit
94
0
IN a relatively circular Earth orbit, how far away from Earth would you have to be in order to avoid collisions?
 
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  • #2
Collisions with what?
 
  • #3
sorry, man made objects
 
  • #4
keepit said:
sorry, man made objects

Ah. What do you know about the subject so far? What altitudes are used for the various low-Earth orbits? What altitude is used by geosynchronous satellites?
 
  • #5
I should have been more explicit. Circular geosynchronous orbits, 26,000 miles as i understand it, is rarified as far as man made objects. I was wondering how far above Earth an object would have to be to have a high likelihood of not colliding with low Earth orbit objects and above.
 
  • #6
To my understanding, once your out of LEO you've passed most of the debris.
 

1. What is the Optimal Distance for Collision-Free Earth Orbit?

The optimal distance for collision-free Earth orbit is known as the geostationary orbit, which is approximately 35,786 kilometers (22,236 miles) above the Earth's equator.

2. How was the Optimal Distance for Collision-Free Earth Orbit determined?

The geostationary orbit was determined through a combination of mathematical calculations and observations of orbital dynamics. It was first calculated by the Russian scientist Konstantin Tsiolkovsky in the late 19th century and later confirmed by experiments in the mid-20th century.

3. What are the benefits of using the Optimal Distance for Collision-Free Earth Orbit?

The geostationary orbit has several benefits, including providing a stable platform for communication and observation satellites, as well as reducing the risk of collisions with other objects in orbit.

4. Can the Optimal Distance for Collision-Free Earth Orbit change?

Yes, the geostationary orbit can change over time due to various factors such as atmospheric drag and gravitational interactions with other objects in space. However, these changes are typically small and can be corrected through orbital maneuvers.

5. Are there any potential challenges or limitations with the Optimal Distance for Collision-Free Earth Orbit?

One potential limitation is that the geostationary orbit is only suitable for objects that need to maintain a fixed position relative to the Earth's surface, such as communication and observation satellites. It is not suitable for spacecraft that need to travel to other planets or explore deep space.

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