Origin of Dark Energy: Before the Big Bang

In summary, it is possible that dark energy didnt originate from bigbang but from another that precedes the bigbang. It is also possible that dark matter is affecting something in our solar system.
  • #1
richerrich
33
0
1. Is it possible that dark energy didnt originate from bigbang but from another that precedes the bigbang?

2. Are dark energy and dark matter in our solar system?

Thank you very much
 
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  • #2
I can't answer question number one because nobody knows and their is no possible way to test that yet. As for question number two the answer is yes. Dark matter and dark energy make up 95% of the universe while the matter we know makes up the rest.
 
  • #3
95% of the mass-energy content in the Universe.
 
  • #4
Waveparticle said:
I can't answer question number one because nobody knows and their is no possible way to test that yet. As for question number two the answer is yes. Dark matter and dark energy make up 95% of the universe while the matter we know makes up the rest.

2.1 If so then dark matter must be affecting something in our solar system. Or some observation of gravitational lensing between stars in our galaxy has been observed not just between galaxies. Dark matter may have altered some planet's orbit.

2.2 If dark energy is in our solar system or galaxy could there be any evidence? Is dark energy only observable between galaxies?
 
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  • #5
If so then dark matter must be affecting something in our solar system. Or some observation of gravitational lensing between stars in our galaxy has been observed not just between galaxies. Dark matter may have altered some planet's orbit.

The amount of dark matter in our solar system, if it is similar to the average galactic density, would be about a kilogram or so, I think. Wouldn't be able to affect anything.
 
  • #6
nicksauce said:
The amount of dark matter in our solar system, if it is similar to the average galactic density, would be about a kilogram or so, I think. Wouldn't be able to affect anything.

Don't know about that, but it is small.

Using the value from [1] for a density of 0.39 GeV/cm^3 and a characteristic solar system scale of about 100AU, I get a total energy ~ 10^35 J, or dividing by c^2, ~10^18 kg. At any rate, this mass corresponds to one of the medium size asteroids in the asteroid belt, roughly 80km in diameter. Considering that measuring the effect of such an object would be near impossible, and the DM is spread over the entire solar system, the chance of any kind of detection event is still nil.


[1]: http://arxiv.org/abs/0907.0018
 
  • #7
Yeah you're right, I don't know why I had 1kg in my mind. 10^18 kg is the number I get after a quick calculation.
 
  • #8
Nabeshin said:
Don't know about that, but it is small.

Using the value from [1] for a density of 0.39 GeV/cm^3 and a characteristic solar system scale of about 100AU, I get a total energy ~ 10^35 J, or dividing by c^2, ~10^18 kg. At any rate, this mass corresponds to one of the medium size asteroids in the asteroid belt, roughly 80km in diameter. Considering that measuring the effect of such an object would be near impossible, and the DM is spread over the entire solar system, the chance of any kind of detection event is still nil.


[1]: http://arxiv.org/abs/0907.0018

Thank you very much Nabeshin.
 

Related to Origin of Dark Energy: Before the Big Bang

1. What is Dark Energy?

Dark Energy is a theoretical form of energy that is believed to make up about 70% of the universe. It is thought to be responsible for the accelerated expansion of the universe.

2. Where does Dark Energy come from?

The exact origin of Dark Energy is still unknown. Some theories suggest that it may have existed since the beginning of the universe, while others propose that it is constantly being created by the expansion of space.

3. How is Dark Energy related to the Big Bang?

Dark Energy is believed to have played a crucial role in the early stages of the universe after the Big Bang. It is thought that it caused the universe to expand at an accelerated rate, which led to the formation of galaxies and other structures.

4. Can we observe Dark Energy?

Currently, we cannot directly observe Dark Energy since it does not interact with light or other forms of electromagnetic radiation. However, its effects on the expansion of the universe can be observed through various astronomical observations and experiments.

5. What are some proposed theories about the origin of Dark Energy?

Some theories suggest that Dark Energy is a manifestation of the vacuum energy of space, while others propose that it is a result of an unknown force or field. Other theories propose that Dark Energy may be a consequence of the existence of extra dimensions in the universe.

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