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Oumuamua may be an alien lightsail?

  1. Oct 31, 2018 #1

    BWV

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    Discussed here
    https://www.centauri-dreams.org/2018/10/29/on-oumuamua-thin-films-and-lightsails/

    referencing this paper by Baily & Loeb @ Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

    ’Oumuamua (1I/2017 U1) is the first object of interstellar origin observed in the Solar system. Recently, Micheli et al. (2018) reported that ’Oumuamua showed deviations from a Keplerian orbit at a high statistical significance. The observed trajectory is best explained by an excess radial acceleration ∆a ∝ r −2 , where r is the distance of ’Oumuamua from the Sun. Such an acceleration is naturally expected for comets, driven by the evaporating material. However, recent observational and theoretical studies imply that ’Oumuamua is not an active comet. We explore the possibility that the excess acceleration results from Solar radiation pressure. The required mass-to-area ratio is m/A ≈ 0.1 g cm−2 . For a thin sheet, this requires a width of w ≈ 0.3−0.9 mm. We find that although extremely thin, such an object would survive an interstellar travel over Galactic distances of ∼ 5 kpc , withstanding collisions with gas and dust-grains as well as stresses from rotation and tidal forces. We discuss the possible origins of such an object.
    https://arxiv.org/pdf/1810.11490.pdf
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 31, 2018 #2
    "We have shown that the observed non-gravitational acceleration of ’Oumuamua, may be explained by Solar radiation pressure."
    I think this part is important. Is it possible that there can be any other explanations ?. Also I think its also important to think how it can be so thin ? If its alien lightsail then where it is going ?
     
  4. Nov 1, 2018 #3

    stefan r

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    There can be other explanations. If you assume their calculated density of 0.1 g/cm2 then you do not need much gas to accelerate.

    An alien popped balloon works better than an alien light sail. Accelerating a light weight object requires much less gas so failure to detect gas would be expected. For example, if the density is 1 g/cm2 you get 90% acceleration from gas and 10% light pressure. Instead of a balloon you could use a foam or aerogel.

    Imagine asking that question on an island when you observe a polymer bag drifting by in the wind. A garbage bag or shopping bag would be my first two guesses based on experience with litter in the USA. Trying to decipher the original purpose without getting a sample would be challenging.
    You could also consider wind dispersed seeds. Cottonwood trees and dandelions do not likely know where they are sending seeds, perhaps "down wind". Wind dispersed pollen has a target destination but the tree hits the target by shotgun strategy. You can speculate on what evolutionary advantages a tree gains by causing human allergies but it is not likely to generate a good model of a tree.
     
  5. Nov 1, 2018 #4
    Thanks for your explanation.

    Well you are right on that matter, I thought that, we can calculate its trajectory and find out that maybe its headed to another solar system.
     
  6. Nov 1, 2018 #5
    Well if it's some kind of exploratory craft, it appears to have decided that the solar system wasn't that interesting.
     
  7. Nov 6, 2018 #6
    Didn't I read somewhere that there is one of these 'Oumuamua-type excursions into the Solar System every day, it's just that they go unobserved and unrecorded? It would seem unlikely that they are all alien artifacts, or even a small percentage of them. Or the universe would be crawling and overrun with Ancient Civilizations.
     
  8. Nov 6, 2018 #7
    Unless the artifacts are Berserkers.
     
  9. Nov 6, 2018 #8

    Sanborn Chase

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    The actual imaging I've been able to see doesn't show a rocky uneven "rock" but rather a uniform shape. Could this be due to a low resolution?
     
  10. Nov 6, 2018 #9
    Do you have any links to these "actual images"? I don't think there is optical system in existence that is even close to being able to resolve 'Oumuamua at the distances involved even at closest approach.
     
  11. Nov 6, 2018 #10
    Will intercepting Oumuamua with a probe ever be possible? Or is it too fast? Too hard to find where it will go in that time?
     
  12. Nov 6, 2018 #11
    Its not possible to send a probe. Its too fast
     
  13. Nov 6, 2018 #12

    Sanborn Chase

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    I'm sorry, but I can't find the image I saw months ago. I think it was a radar image; could Arecibo resolve it?
     
  14. Nov 6, 2018 #13
    Its possible i guess. Its hard to believe that it can be some sort of ailen lightsail...since it has not emitting radio signals..
     
  15. Nov 6, 2018 #14

    Sanborn Chase

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    I agree "alien probe" would be towards the end of my list.
     
  16. Nov 12, 2018 #15

    stefan r

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    The paper written on it just says thin film accelerated by sunlight. If you assume artificial objects made by a civilization, then trash is by far the most likely object we will see.
    If a radio used a light sail to slow down it might make make sense to jettison the sail after passing the Sun. The sail could have tether launched a small probe which then made a close pass on one of the planets. All of the planets were on the same side of the Sun this year.
     
  17. Nov 16, 2018 #16

    LURCH

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    If this object were venting volatiles from the side being warmed by the Sun, this could result in a reaction force that might mimic acceleration from solar pressure. Could these two scenarios be differentiated by observation? What I mean is; could we tell the difference, just by looking, between an object so light that it gets noticeable acceleration from solar wind, and a much heavier object being accelerated by reaction force from the venting of volatiles? Would the cloud created by so much venting necessarily be visible to us?
     
  18. Nov 17, 2018 #17
  19. Nov 17, 2018 #18

    LURCH

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    Wow, that looks remarkably consistent to me. Is that normal? Specifically; is it normal for the signal to remain so uniform from one end to the other? I know it’s only a spread of about two days, but at the speed this thing was going, surely by the end of observation on the 27th we were seeing it from a significantly different angle from the one we saw at the beginning of the graph, on the 25th, right? Please, someone with more experience take a look at that chart and tell me if it looks normal. Not that we have much to which to compare regarding, “normal compared to other extrasolar objects we’ve observed passing through our system “, but do asteroids and burned out comets usually look like that?
     
  20. Nov 18, 2018 #19
    Does anyone else find this to be the most compelling possibility of alien contact since the Wow! signal? I find it a lot more compelling actually. I am a bit disappointed with the unenthusiastic response from many scientists.

    There really has never been anything like this in human history and we were alive to see it. At the very least it is the first interstellar object we have ever seen up close, but it is sufficiently weird that the hairs on the back of my neck...well. It really could be an alien probe. So far at least that is a very real possibility and I think that is worth admitting. Absolutely no evidence can rule that out at this point.

    What I would like to see is what data we have that makes this possibility less likely. The first disappointment for me is that it is traveling so slow. Only 26 km/sec or 0.000087c. Well below what even our primitive tech could accomplish if we had infinite money. Even we could get up to 0.05c with nuclear pulsed Orion ships or more speculative but promising designs like fission fragment or nuclear salt water.

    It has always been assumed that any aliens who made contact with us would be far more advanced because we are so primitive that if they were any less advanced they could not communicate with us or even find us and a similar level of science development is just utterly improbable.

    But we dont really know much about this object aside from maybe its overall mass and size, interstellar trajectory with active adjustments, and its weird changing albedo. Has anyone checked to see if the albedo changes are nonrandom? Maybe they say Hello World or Prepare to be exterminated, Earthlings.

    If it is an alien probe its subtle behavior and low speed could be explained by it being part of a swarm program. Maybe hundreds of thousands of slow and basic solar sail crafts were manufactured and launched to explore the galaxy. Maybe it releases a mini probe too small for us to detect to explore each system and report back with neutrino or gamma ray laser pulses or some other communication system way beyond our level.

    Even in the unlikely event the miniprobe used microwave RF transmission it would be above 100 Ghz and would be directed away from us so even if we were listening at such high frequencies that are mostly absorbed by our thick atmosphere we wouldnt detect it.

    If it actually does try to make contact with us I would imagine it would try several methods limited by cost and mass considerations and the fact that maybe they cannot predict what RF or EM frequencies could make it through our atmosphere. Even if the source civ is or was alive it may or may not be life as we know it. They may not assume a thick Nitrogen Oxygen mix. Surely laser pulses would be a safe bet though. We should be looking for those as well as 77Ghz, 29-32 Ghz, and 9-12 Ghz microwave pulses coming from a likely perihelion transfer solar orbit.

    It is possible that the mini-probes do not have sufficient intelligence or detection capabilities to decide on their own if they detect a planet with life or intelligent life and that they just transmit back neutrino pulses or whatever with images and spectroscopy and other analytic data upon arrival. If thats the case we may not know for hundreds of years about the probe's presence due to the round trip communication times. Any system with intelligent life is very unlikely to be closer than 100 ly even if intelligent life is very abundant in our galaxy.

    If it is an alien artifact of some kind and did not drop a payload will we be able to detect if it turns around and comes back in an omgwtf double take pattern in 50-250 years from now? Or even sooner if it is a smart enough device to see that there is something very very odd about the third planet?
     
  21. Nov 18, 2018 #20
    Another now obvious explanation for its slow speed just occured to me. It could have been decelerating for many years bevore arriving here for its solar slingshot. The alien civ would want its solar system tour to be slow enough to take photos and do spectroscopy. You would not want to enter the system at 0.7c or whatever they are capable of. Now the question is will it burn its thrusters again to accelerate when it gets past the final planet in its trajectory?

    Or maybe it is just a solar sail probe. But wait...can we measure the small acceleration or deceleration that a solar sail around the size of the object would experience? Would a solar sail not have a slightly different trajectory around the sun than either a normal asteroid or a cigar shaped vehicle without a sail? It would be a powered object rather rather than a passive one.

    Btw I am excited by the possibility but I am not making any claim whatsover that this is in fact an alien artifact. I would bet large sums of money on our not seeing an object like this again in any of our lifetimes though. I am skeptical of the several times per year idea. Interstellar objects are probably rare and ones whose trajectories just happen to intersect with other star systems are rarer still I would imagine. Before this I believe the general consensus was that they did not exist at all. Now all of a sudden they are supposed to be routine. Right. Any theories on how such an object might attain escape velocity from its solar orbit in the first place?
     
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