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Our Multistar System?

  1. Jul 26, 2010 #1

    cph

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    Our multi-stellar system?

    Most stars form in multiples. Where are our sister stars? All of such sisters should be of somewhat similar mass, main sequence, and hence not supernova material; perhaps harboring life, and even culture? Such sisters must not be so far off. Hence might they be detectable by looking for 'cold' Jupiters? Use an infrared telescope to evaluate the luminosity and size of such gas giants, and through comparison, see if any are close. Such star(s) should be much less than 1 light year, and hence within the Oort Cloud. Thus if such sister stars are within our Oort Cloud, it would seem then to be a distorted cloud, common to such multiple star systems.
     
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  3. Jul 26, 2010 #2

    Chronos

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    Sorry to burst the bubble, but, no companion star. Gravitational effects would be very pronounced on planetary orbits.
     
  4. Jul 28, 2010 #3

    Borg

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    http://chandra.harvard.edu/xray_sources/binary_stars.html" do not have as a rule, similar mass for each of the stars.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2017
  5. Jul 31, 2010 #4

    cph

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    Might a brown dwarf be a member of such considered multiplex for inside common Oort Cloud?
     
  6. Aug 1, 2010 #5

    Borg

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    As Chronos stated, the gravitational effects would be very pronounced on planetary orbits.
     
  7. Aug 4, 2010 #6

    cph

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    Might one also include an all infrared sky survey, looking for gas giants in general of other star systems? Thus building up a data set, and hence ascertaining how typical our system might be.
     
  8. Aug 4, 2010 #7

    Ich

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  9. Aug 7, 2010 #8
    Thank ya Ich, was gonna say that there was a story about that a while back in Sci-Am or NS.

    The galaxy doesn't turn as a solid disc, it only has a rotational profile like one, the stars in the arms mix and jostle around over the timescales we're talking about.
     
  10. Sep 4, 2010 #9

    cph

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    Our multi-stellar system? updated

    Most stars form in multiples. Where are our sister stars? All of such sisters should be of somewhat similar mass, main sequence; but empirically perhaps 1 supernova. Such sisters must not be so far off. Hence might they be detectable by looking for 'cold' Jupiters? Use a dedicated infrared telescope to evaluate the luminosity and size of such gas giants, and through comparison, see if any are close. Such star(s) should be much less than 1 light year away, and hence within the common Oort Cloud. Thus if such sister stars are within our Oort Cloud, would it seem then to be a distorted cloud, common to such multiple star systems? However such set of sister stars would have a center of mass, and in accordance with a central force, a spherical distributed common Oort cloud of cometary material. Hence overlapping gravitational fields for such set of sister stars. Also if terrestrials are detected, then perhaps spectroscopically look for the atmospheric oxygen signature of photosynthesis. Also perhaps radio attention might be of interest for such near by sister star systems.
     
  11. Sep 4, 2010 #10

    Vanadium 50

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    Why are you repeating your starting point? The forum is about dialogue, not monologue.
     
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