Physics lessons on PF

thank you, tom
 

Danger

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yourdadonapogostick said:
what you learn from reading threads is incomplete. say you read a thread on how to differentiate a function.
Y'know what, dude? I don't even know what a 'function' is, never mind how to differentiate one from the other. What I do know is that I am completely at home in an environment where professional scientists and teachers of future professional scientists will treat you as a thinking individual regardless of your background or pretentions. (The pretentions, by the way, will not last long. I mean, seriously... you are–at 17–offering to teach a course in nuclear engineering when one of the primary jokesters in this site is a nuclear engineer by profession and has taught at levels higher than you have studied at?) Just lose the ego and absorb. It's one of the best educations that you could hope for.
 
not only did i get a post, but it came with a free attitude! thanx, danger!
 

jtbell

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Moonbear said:
If all you want is someone's class notes, then you're going to get what you pay for. I've seen many students' notes and they are generally not very useful if you have not sat through the lecture.
Neither are many professors' lecture notes, mine in particular. My lecture notes are not polished scripts for me to recite from; they're reminders of topics that I need to discuss, more like skeleton outlines with worked-out examples that I'm going to develop in class. They are not intended as replacements for the textbook or students' own notes.

Also, the worked-out examples and derivations in my notes often are just starting points or "sanity checks" for classroom discussion. As we all know, there's usually more than one way to solve any non-trivial problem. I use my notes to set up a problem or derivation, and then I try to get the students involved in working through it by asking things like "OK, which way do you want to go from here?" The solution that ends up on the board is often rather different from what I have in my notes, although it should of course end up with the same result.

Sometimes I write up a more polished version of something to distribute to students, but it's the exception rather than the rule.
 

Astronuc

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Along the lines of Tom Mattson's point, I could see some type of tutorial or class lecture for say freshman or sophomore level courses, i.e. at an introductory level. Otherwise, we could do special topics, which most of the forum topics are anyway.

I suppose, like Tom, any expert could initiate a thread, as Tom and ZapperZ have done on a particular subject. On the other hand, a very comprehensive discussion could still require some effort. For example, whole texts can be devoted to one particular alloy system, its basic materials properties, how it is made, how it performs, what research has been accomplished, what research needs to be done. Now multiply that by thousands of alloys.
 

shmoe

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yourdadonapogostick said:
you guys keep telling me that there are sections that reccomend textbooks. textbooks are rather expensive(as far as books go). this would be a free source of information. i also think that you overestimate the time required. if you are taking a class, just post therelavant parts of your notes.
Texts can be expensive, but that's why there are libraries.

Maybe you should lead by example and provide lessons in something you know well, or type up your notes from a class you're taking along with your own interpretations of what's important.
 

Moonbear

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jtbell said:
Neither are many professors' lecture notes, mine in particular. My lecture notes are not polished scripts for me to recite from; they're reminders of topics that I need to discuss, more like skeleton outlines with worked-out examples that I'm going to develop in class.
Isn't that what I said? Maybe I didn't make the point strongly enough. :wink:

Tom, that's great that you're planning on posting some additional "lessons" here. As you know, it certainly requires time and effort, and isn't something anyone can just whip together overnight.

I have considered writing something along the lines of "common misconceptions about evolution" rather than having to repeat the same information every time someone asks a question on it, but again, other things get in the way. When I have the sort of clear blocks of time that are conducive to writing, and I'm in the right frame of mind to sit down and focus on writing, I have other things that need to take priority.

Even if I were to type up what I've presented in lectures, my lectures are in context of an entire course, and assume students will already be familiar with various concepts from previous lectures such that the content of the lesson will not make much sense if you have not been present for the other lessons preceeding mine, require that they've read the assigned reading material in advance of the class, and arrive prepared for a discussion rather than sitting and listening to me talk for an hour (I have only been teaching senior and graduate level courses for the past several years; it's been a long time since I've taught introductory level courses). My notes for these types of courses tend to be comments in the margins of journal articles as a reminder of key points I want the students to identify and as questions to prod them into thinking about what they've read and to prompt discussion if it slows down or goes off-track.
 
shmoe said:
Texts can be expensive, but that's why there are libraries.

Maybe you should lead by example and provide lessons in something you know well, or type up your notes from a class you're taking along with your own interpretations of what's important.
HA! library! i guess you have a better one than we do.

i already did....well a link to it....i guess i can repost the thread here...
 

Tom Mattson

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yourdadonapogostick said:
HA! library! i guess you have a better one than we do.
Are you in college? If not, is there a college nearby?

Right now I'm teaching at a community college, and even our library has books that cover all 4 undergrad years in math, science, and engineering.
 

Moonbear

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Tom Mattson said:
Are you in college? If not, is there a college nearby?

Right now I'm teaching at a community college, and even our library has books that cover all 4 undergrad years in math, science, and engineering.
He's still in high school, so might not be able to check out books from a college library.

Local public libraries do vary a lot on what they offer. Though, if you haven't checked recently, you might want to look now that it's summertime. Often, textbooks are checked out during the school year by people who need extra material for their classes or for assignments or to work with a tutor, and then they are returned during the summer recess. Also, you can find out if your library has an interlibrary loan arrangement where you can get a book from a better library through your library membership. If you find a book you want in a store or through recommendations here, get the ISSN number off it (you can probably PM someone who recommends a textbook here to ask for the ISSN number off their copy). That will help your library locate a copy of it and make sure they get you the right one if they can fill an interlibrary loan request.
 

Danger

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yourdadonapogostick said:
not only did i get a post, but it came with a free attitude! thanx, danger!
You're entirely welcome. Poking holes in balloons is one of the things that I do best.

Moonbear said:
He's still in high school, so might not be able to check out books from a college library.
I don't know how it works down there in Yank land, but as a (ex?)professional writer I'm entitled to library privileges from both University of Calgary and the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology. Not only do I get a free card, but I don't have to wait in line with students in order to obtain it.
 
Tom Mattson said:
Are you in college? If not, is there a college nearby?

Right now I'm teaching at a community college, and even our library has books that cover all 4 undergrad years in math, science, and engineering.
...not so lucky...
 

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