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Powering a transducer

  1. May 1, 2006 #1
    Hi there,
    I am trying to power a piezielectric transducer that can operate between 0 watts and 50 watts (max). I have a function generator to generate a sine wave at 40 kHz.

    I am not sure how to go about taking the output of the function generator and connecting the piezoelectric transducer. I think I need an amplifier correct? But what kind? Etc? Any help would be great, I am totally stuck (not an electrical engineer obviously).

    Thanks,
    Brett
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 2, 2006 #2

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    50W at 40kHz? Yikes! What is the application? Is it some sonar thing, or maybe a serious dog repellant machine?

    But seriously, that sounds kind of dangerous. You should be careful experimenting with something like that. I'm no expert on medical stuff, but it seems like you could get some pretty serious inner ear damage from being exposed to that level of ultrasonic energy. I wouldn't experiment with it in a lab full of unsuspecting people, for example, and you should probably wear ear protection at the very least.

    40kHz is a bit above the traditional audio range, but some audiophiles claim that stereo equipment that can run up into the 40kHz range produce better audio sound than more band-limited equipment. So you might be able to find a high-end audio amp that will work for you at 40kHz. What is the input impedance of the piezo transducer? You will want to match the amp's output impedance to the transducer if you can.

    What kind of distortion specs are you looking for in the amplification stage?
     
  4. May 4, 2006 #3

    FredGarvin

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    Science Advisor

    I echo the 50W?!?!?! Holy schnikies. I must admit the when I see piezoelectric I think accelerometers. It will be interesting to know of the application here. I am thinking along the same lines, possibly underwater acoustics?
     
  5. May 4, 2006 #4

    russ_watters

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    Staff: Mentor

    I did my senior design project on building a test apparatus for them for the company that makes the Navy's towed sonar arrays. Unfortunately, I was on the mechanical testing end, so I can't help with the electrical stuff here, but I bet the second most profitable application they had was bathroom scales!
     
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