1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Support PF! Reminder for those going back to school to buy their text books via PF Here!
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Classical Problem collection for mechanics?

  1. Mar 4, 2015 #1
    I have to write my mechanics I exam. Briefly I will have problems based on: kinematics, newton's law, euler's law. That's it. Do you know some website, online problem collection on this topic? Better if mixed? I just was looking for additional material about that. Thank you in advance!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 5, 2015 #2

    jedishrfu

    Staff: Mentor

    Why not be creative and cast problems in your book into everyday situations?

    I did this once with a truck rolling down a slight incline and asked whether it was smart to try to stop it from rolling by jumping in front and pushing back.

    It was for a lecture on Newtons Third Law F=ma that I gave during a job interview for an instructor ship at the local community college.

    I'm sure you can come up with other examples.

    Who will be taking this exam? Is this a homework assignment from your teacher? Or are you the teacher?
     
  4. Mar 5, 2015 #3
    Sorry, maybe I was not clear. I'm the student, I just have to do this exam of Mechanics I. Since I saw, that the professor in the past years gave always different types of problems, I was searching here for additional material to practice with these stuff..
     
  5. Mar 5, 2015 #4

    jedishrfu

    Staff: Mentor

    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  6. Mar 13, 2015 #5
    Thank you very much!
     
  7. Mar 13, 2015 #6
    If this isn't an honours course, and you want to stump people, Kleppner and Kolenkow's Mechanics book is perfect. I'm working through the problems in my own time, where I can spend a decent amount of time on each one, but they still stump me every so often. The first 3 chapters should have what you're looking for. If you don't want to stump them, I'd still suggest picking one maybe for extra credit, just to really challenge their understanding of the concepts (which is what they do best).
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted