Looking for the absolute best fluid mechanics book available

In summary, when searching for the best fluid mechanics book, it is important to consider the level of detail, clarity of explanations, and practical applications covered in the text. Look for a book that covers the fundamentals of fluid mechanics, such as fluid properties, flow equations, and boundary conditions, while also providing real-world examples and problem-solving techniques. Additionally, consider the author's expertise and teaching style to ensure the book is suitable for your learning needs.
  • #1
Reinhart
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Dear physics forum dwellers,

Currently on search for an advanced fluid mechanics book that covers all the nitty gritty details. Not looking for general introduction books like Munson, Rothmayer, ... or Cengel that are used in bachelor physics classes or engineering classes. Even after skimming the content of Landau and Lifshitz, it is not really the book I am looking for.

I want something in line of 'The physics of fluids and plasmas' by Arnab Raichoudhuri who starts with the collisionless Boltzmann equation to derive the hydrodynamic conservation laws. But I am looking for something more in depth. A book like 'Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Mechanics' by Calkin which offers unique insights and relations to other domains within physics. Bonus points for geometrical interpretations.

Thanks in advance!

Cheers,
Reinhart
 
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  • #2
I can't claim any level of familiarity with the texts you cite. As someone whose background is engineering, I never took courses at that level on things like Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics (just a first year graduate course in an aerospace department).

However, perhaps if you take a look at something like "An Introduction to Fluid Dynamics" by Batchelor you might find something to your liking. It's certainly one of the more classical and mathematical texts on the subject. I suppose other options might be classical texts by Milne-Thomson or Lamb. Something a bit newer and more textbook-like (as opposed to more of a treatise) might be "Incompressible Flow" by Panton.
 
  • #3
For me the best textbook on the subject is Landau and Lifshitz vol. 6 emphasizing the physics point of view. For the deeper foundation from kinetic theory, I'd recommend vol. 10 as a starting point. For the state of the art of relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics derived from relativistic kinetic theory, I'd recommend more recent research papers and reviews if needed.
 
  • #4
Reinhart said:
Dear physics forum dwellers,

Currently on search for an advanced fluid mechanics book that covers all the nitty gritty details. Not looking for general introduction books like Munson, Rothmayer, ... or Cengel that are used in bachelor physics classes or engineering classes. Even after skimming the content of Landau and Lifshitz, it is not really the book I am looking for.

I want something in line of 'The physics of fluids and plasmas' by Arnab Raichoudhuri who starts with the collisionless Boltzmann equation to derive the hydrodynamic conservation laws. But I am looking for something more in depth. A book like 'Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Mechanics' by Calkin which offers unique insights and relations to other domains within physics. Bonus points for geometrical interpretations.

Thanks in advance!

Cheers,
Reinhart
Bird, Stewart and Lightfoot's "Transport Phenomena" is a world-class standard text.

Calkin's book doesn't appear to have much in the way of fluid mechanics, but perhaps Brenner's "Macrotransport Processes" is in line with what you are thinking of (especially Part II):

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01H5GQGSG/?tag=pfamazon01-20
 
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  • #5
Andy Resnick said:
Bird, Stewart and Lightfoot's "Transport Phenomena" is a world-class standard text.

Calkin's book doesn't appear to have much in the way of fluid mechanics, but perhaps Brenner's "Macrotransport Processes" is in line with what you are thinking of (especially Part II):

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01H5GQGSG/?tag=pfamazon01-20
This book looks super fun!
 
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  • #6
All the old timers I work with swear by "the Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Compressible Fluid Flow" Vols I & II by Ascher Shapiro.
And his lectures are online http://web.mit.edu/hml/ncfmf.html
 
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  • #8
If you're interested in Maxwell-Boltzmann theory, a classic is "The mathematical theory of nonuniform gases" by Chapman and Cowling. There is also "The mathematical theory of viscous incompressible flow" from Ladyzhenskaya (she is the L in the LBB condition: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ladyzhenskaya–Babuška–Brezzi_condition) with background on e.g. the proof of Leray for the 2D version of 'the navier stokes problem' (finiteness of solutions for finite initial/boundary conditions). For a complete bible, look at the books of Monin and Yaglom "statistical fluid mechanics"

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003CWGEDK/?tag=pfamazon01-20
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1614276714/?tag=pfamazon01-20
https://www.amazon.com/dp/0486458830/?tag=pfamazon01-20
 
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Related to Looking for the absolute best fluid mechanics book available

1. What is the best way to determine the quality of a fluid mechanics book?

The best way to determine the quality of a fluid mechanics book is to look at the credentials and experience of the author. A book written by a renowned expert in the field will likely be more comprehensive and accurate.

2. Are there any specific criteria to consider when evaluating a fluid mechanics book?

Yes, there are several criteria to consider when evaluating a fluid mechanics book. These include the level of detail and explanation, the use of real-world examples, the organization and structure of the material, and the inclusion of practice problems and solutions.

3. What are some recommended books for learning fluid mechanics?

Some highly recommended books for learning fluid mechanics include "Introduction to Fluid Mechanics" by Robert W. Fox, "Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics" by Bruce R. Munson, and "Fluid Mechanics" by Frank M. White. These books are widely used in universities and are known for their clear explanations and thorough coverage of the subject.

4. Is it necessary to have a strong background in math to understand fluid mechanics?

While a strong background in math is helpful in understanding fluid mechanics, it is not necessary. Many fluid mechanics books provide a review of the necessary mathematical concepts and equations, making it accessible to readers with varying levels of mathematical knowledge.

5. Are there any online resources or supplemental materials that can enhance the learning experience of a fluid mechanics book?

Yes, there are many online resources and supplemental materials available to enhance the learning experience of a fluid mechanics book. These can include video lectures, interactive simulations, and practice problems with solutions. It is also helpful to join online forums or discussion groups to ask questions and engage with other learners.

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