Question regarding physical optics - (plane-polarized light)

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of light polarization and how it affects intensity. The question involves finding the angle and intensity reduction for light passing through two polarizers at 30 degrees relative to each other. The solution suggests using the intensity reduction formula twice and finding the two reduction factors that result in a product of 1/4. The answer given in the book is unclear and may contradict the given information. The speaker thanks anyone who can provide assistance in understanding the question.
  • #1
Sanosuke Sagara
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I have my question,solution,doubt in the attachment that followed.Thanks for anybody that spend sometime on this question.
 

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  • #2
Please,I really need somebody help to explain to me what the question want so that I can have a better understanding of the question.Thanks for anybody that spend some time one this question.
 
  • #3
Sanosuke Sagara said:
I have my question,solution,doubt in the attachment that followed.Thanks for anybody that spend sometime on this question.

The light entering the first polarizer is already polarized. There will be an reduction in intensity that depends on the angle of the polarizer relative to the direction of light polarization at each of the polarizers. The reduction at the first polarizer will not be 1/2. It appears you know how to find the intensity reduction when polarized light passes through a single polarizer. You need to apply that twice. At the second polarizer the angle will be 30 degrees, so the final intensity will be a factor that you can calculate, based on the angle, times the intensity in the middle region. The intensity in the middle region will be a similar factor (not the same factor) times the initial intensity. You need to figure out the two reduction factors so that their product is 1/4, resolve that into the individual reduction factors, and use the intensity reduction at the first polarizer to find the angle.

I can't make sense of the answer you say is given in the book. The way it is stated appears to contradict the statement that the two polarizers are at 30 degrees relative to one another. Make sure you are looking a the correct answer.
 
  • #4
Thanks for your suggestion and the solution to this question,OlderDan and I really appreciate it.I will try to understand the question by myself.
 

1. What is plane-polarized light?

Plane-polarized light is a type of light in which the electric field oscillates in one direction along a specific plane. This means that all the light waves are aligned in the same direction, creating a uniform and consistent pattern of light.

2. How is plane-polarized light different from unpolarized light?

Unpolarized light is a type of light in which the electric field oscillates in all possible directions. This means that the light waves are not aligned and are randomly oriented. In contrast, plane-polarized light has all the light waves aligned in the same direction.

3. How is plane-polarized light created?

Plane-polarized light can be created by passing unpolarized light through a polarizing filter. The filter only allows light waves oscillating in a specific direction to pass through, resulting in plane-polarized light.

4. What is the significance of plane-polarized light in optics?

Plane-polarized light is important in optics because it can be used to study the behavior of light waves and their interactions with different materials. It is also widely used in various optical instruments, such as polarizing microscopes and 3D glasses, to enhance contrast and reduce glare.

5. Can plane-polarized light be converted back to unpolarized light?

Yes, plane-polarized light can be converted back to unpolarized light by passing it through a second polarizing filter with its axis of polarization perpendicular to the first filter's axis. This process is known as depolarization.

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