Radiofrequency communication through tissue

  • #1
20
1

Main Question or Discussion Point

Hello,
I am a Biologist currently working on a Biocommunication related project.
To explain the project, I am going to use a Piezo sensor attached to the bone and it can detect bone cracks using EMI. I would first energize Piezo sensor with certain frquencies and it generates Ultrasonic waves that can detect crack. However after detection, I want to transmit the data over the muscle and skin using Radio-frequency technology.
I am thinking to attach one RF transmitter to the sensor at the bone and keep the receiver at the skin.

As a newbie, I have no idea which kind of transmitter and receiver I should buy and use.

Would be great if anyone can help.

Thanks,
Mit
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
berkeman
Mentor
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I googled the title of this thread, and got lots of useful hits:

https://www.google.com/search?q=rf+communication+through+tissue&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b-1

There are a number of good articles about RF transmission through tissues (and other body structures), like this one:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3715232/

I'm not sure there is an off-the-shelf system that you can just buy to use. Do you have any EEs on your team who could build something up once you settle on the most appropriate RF band to use?
 
  • #3
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Many thanks. I will check the articles to understand the RF communication through tissue.
 
  • #4
48
7
Hello,
I am a Biologist currently working on a Biocommunication related project.
To explain the project, I am going to use a Piezo sensor attached to the bone and it can detect bone cracks using EMI. I would first energize Piezo sensor with certain frquencies and it generates Ultrasonic waves that can detect crack. However after detection, I want to transmit the data over the muscle and skin using Radio-frequency technology.
I am thinking to attach one RF transmitter to the sensor at the bone and keep the receiver at the skin.

As a newbie, I have no idea which kind of transmitter and receiver I should buy and use.

Would be great if anyone can help.

Thanks,
Mit
2.550 GHz is easy to work with and works well trough skin. I'd suggest looking around on NCBI as well.
 
  • #5
20
1
Many Thanks
 
  • #6
Baluncore
Science Advisor
2019 Award
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As a newbie, I have no idea which kind of transmitter and receiver I should buy and use.
It would help to know if your ultrasonic generator and detector are based on a pulse, a chirp or continuous wave.
Is the detected signal an analog or digital signal?
What is the bandwidth of the detected ultrasonic signal?
Any signal will pass through tissue given sufficient power. The antenna design will need to be considered carefully.
 
  • #7
berkeman
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An IC design engineer that used to work here had previously helped to design the IC that went into a small pill that was swallowed by the patient. It transmitted data as it passed through the patient, and was eliminated smoothly along with other solid waste. He doesn't work here any more, and unfortunately I don't remember the name of the company that he did it for.

But I did a Goggle search just now for RF Pill Transponder, and got some good hits. Maybe have a look at the hit list to see if it helps in your investigation:

https://www.google.com/search?q=rf+pill+transponder&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b-1
 
  • #8
20
1
It would help to know if your ultrasonic generator and detector are based on a pulse, a chirp or continuous wave.
Is the detected signal an analog or digital signal?
What is the bandwidth of the detected ultrasonic signal?
Any signal will pass through tissue given sufficient power. The antenna design will need to be considered carefully.
Hi. The generated signal is Continuous Analog wave between the range of 40 to 250 Khz.
 
  • #9
20
1
An IC design engineer that used to work here had previously helped to design the IC that went into a small pill that was swallowed by the patient. It transmitted data as it passed through the patient, and was eliminated smoothly along with other solid waste. He doesn't work here any more, and unfortunately I don't remember the name of the company that he did it for.

But I did a Goggle search just now for RF Pill Transponder, and got some good hits. Maybe have a look at the hit list to see if it helps in your investigation:

https://www.google.com/search?q=rf+pill+transponder&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b-1
Thanks
 

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