Riddle: Where is Epsilon in Bohr Model of Atom?

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In summary, the lecture discussed the Bohr model of the atom and the formula for total energy of an electron in orbit. The author of the book used a modified formula for the emitted photon, which did not include epsilon. The poster is curious about why the author left out epsilon in this formula. The poster also mentioned a missing electron mass in the formula. However, another poster pointed out that the formula is in terms of the nth Bohr radius and is using units where epsilon is equal to 1. The original poster also clarified that they use SI units in their institute.
  • #1
AhmedHesham
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Hi curious people
Today i had a lecture about bohr model of the atom .we know that the total energy of electron in orbit is minus e squared divided by 8 pi times epsilon times R of the orbit . this is written in my book and i agree with this .But when the author writes a formula for an emitted photon he writes the difference of the law mentioned above but without epsilon . why ?
Thankes
 
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  • #3
We are curious, not psychics.
 
  • #4
PeterDonis said:
Which book?

His book! He just said so! :wink:

OP, we're looking for the book's title, and author, and if you can do a good job, maybe a scan of that page. If not, please write the entire formula.
 
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  • #5
This is a picture from the book
 

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  • #6
haushofer said:
We are curious, not psychics.
There is no such thing as psychic.
- Patrick Jane
 
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  • #7
I have no idea what units the equation you posted is supposed to be in. There's a missing electron mass, for one thing.
 
  • #8
Vanadium 50 said:
I have no idea what units the equation you posted is supposed to be in. There's a missing electron mass, for one thing.

No, it's not missing. This formula is in terms of the ##n^{th}## Bohr radius ##r_n##, which is given by:

##r_n = \dfrac{n^2 \hbar^2}{Z e^2 m_e}##

(where ##Z## is the number of protons in the nucleus, and ##m_e## is the mass of the electron)

The answer to the original poster's question is that they are using units where ##\epsilon_0 = 1##.
 
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  • #9
Ah...it's buried in the r's. I see,
 
  • #10
stevendaryl said:
he answer to the original poster's question is that they are using units where .

Are you sure? Isn't it buried in the r's as well?
 
  • #11
No ...i think it is missing
We always us SI in my institute
 

Related to Riddle: Where is Epsilon in Bohr Model of Atom?

1. Where is Epsilon located in the Bohr Model of Atom?

In the Bohr Model of Atom, Epsilon is located in the outermost energy level or shell of the atom, known as the valence shell.

2. What is the significance of Epsilon in the Bohr Model of Atom?

Epsilon represents the outermost electron of the atom, which is responsible for the chemical properties and reactivity of the element.

3. How does Epsilon contribute to the stability of an atom in the Bohr Model?

Epsilon, being the outermost electron, has the highest energy level and is held less tightly by the nucleus compared to the inner electrons. This allows it to participate in chemical reactions and maintain the stability of the atom.

4. Can Epsilon move to a different energy level in the Bohr Model?

Yes, Epsilon can move to a different energy level by gaining or losing energy. This process is known as electron excitation or de-excitation, respectively, and is responsible for the emission or absorption of light by the atom.

5. How does the number of Epsilon electrons affect the properties of an element in the Bohr Model?

The number of Epsilon electrons determines the group or column of the element in the periodic table, which is directly related to its chemical properties. Elements with the same number of Epsilon electrons exhibit similar chemical behavior.

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