S,S' in the Lorentz transform.

In summary, the Lorentz transform is used to find the frames S and S' when there is a constant relative velocity between them. S is usually the "at rest" frame, while S' is the moving frame. However, both frames can be inertial frames, defined as frames in which Maxwell's equations or other laws of physics hold true. By applying a Lorentz transformation to S, S' can be obtained and will also be an inertial frame. This method allows for finding all other inertial frames from a given inertial frame.
  • #1
IPhO' 2008
44
0
When we use the Lorentz transform. We must have S,S' frame.
How can we choose S,S' frame?
 
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  • #2
The S frame is the frame "at rest". Usually, you are in the S frame yourself. But if you are in a moving spaceship, for example, and you are asked what people on a planet read on your clock as you whizz by, they are in the "rest frame" S and you are in the moving frame S'.
 
  • #3
Thank you so much.
 
  • #4
S and S' can be any two frames moving with a constant relative velocity between them.
It is not necessary that one of them be "at rest".
 
  • #5
In usual usage, S must be an inertial frame, which is defined to be one in which Maxwell's equations or your favourite laws of physics in their *standard form* are true.

If you use any particular Lorentz transformation on S, you will obtain S', and S' will also be an inertial frame.

Basically, it tells you how to find all other inertial frames given a particular inertial frame.
 
  • #6
atyy said:
In usual usage, S must be an inertial frame, which is defined to be one in which Maxwell's equations or your favourite laws of physics in their *standard form* are true.
So the rest of the laws of physics that aren't my "favourites" don't have to be true to call a frame inertial?
 
  • #7
Al68 said:
So the rest of the laws of physics that aren't my "favourites" don't have to be true to call a frame inertial?

Yeah! Which ones don't you like? :smile:
 

Related to S,S' in the Lorentz transform.

What is the Lorentz transform?

The Lorentz transform is a mathematical equation that describes the relationship between the coordinates of an event measured by two different observers moving at a constant velocity relative to each other. It is a fundamental concept in the theory of special relativity.

What is "S,S' in the Lorentz transform?

In the Lorentz transform, "S" represents the coordinates of the stationary observer and "S'" represents the coordinates of the moving observer. These coordinates are related by the Lorentz transform equation.

How does the Lorentz transform account for time dilation?

The Lorentz transform takes into account the fact that time is relative and can pass at different rates for observers in different reference frames. It includes a time dilation factor that accounts for the difference in time measured by the stationary and moving observers.

What is the significance of the speed of light in the Lorentz transform?

The speed of light, denoted as "c", plays a crucial role in the Lorentz transform as it is the maximum speed at which any information or matter can travel in the universe. The Lorentz transform ensures that the speed of light remains constant for all observers, regardless of their relative velocities.

How does the Lorentz transform explain length contraction?

The Lorentz transform accounts for the phenomenon of length contraction, which is the apparent shorter length of an object when observed from a different reference frame. This is due to the fact that the distance between two points in space and time is relative and can change depending on the observer's frame of reference.

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