Salt to help water to boil

  • #26
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Wow. I was just about to comment on how hard this was to read when I noticed this status message:

Last edited by Noog_Z; Y at 11:53 PM.. Reason: spelling mistakes (:

This is after editing??? :surprised

hey, im a teenager! im more focused on what is actaully in the paragraph more than my spelling. (:

how could u not understand that? what made it hard to read? im confused?:confused:
 
Last edited:
  • #27
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I apologize for reviving a dead thread tat surely none of the OP's are around to defend, but like a book it doesn't lose relevance by being old. I was searching the physics of salt water for cooling purposes, not heat, and so I will continue searching, though...my answer is in here, I am just not smart enough to see it. The reason I felt compelled to post is that everyone lost the "implied" goal of the OP. The OP mentioned cooking, I myself am a chef and remember my basic science classes, and for what I can extrapolate (big word, so I sound intelligent) from such a "smart" group of people is yes salt has an effect on the boiling point of water. What everyone missed, was the effect on the food being boiled. I suppose I best not guess on the physics, but I am curious as to how an increase of salinity increases absorption and thereby more efficiently spreading heat through the mass of the food. I will mention that, as a chef, only foods high in carbohydrates are boiled. corn, potatoes, etc are boiled. Ribs, pork and beef, come to mind, but I suspect this is a crude way of steaming (and a horrible way to treat meat) and "tenderizing" tough proteins. I won't bother with my perspctive on coagulation and such. I merely am searching for an answer and saw some misguided, yet highly "intelligent" people along the way.
 
  • #28
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Knowledge is worthless without purpose.
 
  • #29
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Wow thats a quite old thread... anyway, now that it was summoned from the depths of time, i think it would be useful to make some comments.

Reading the posts, i did see lots and lots of theory, but almost nobody (except one person) actually did an experiment to verify if it was actually true or not.

Put a pan with pure water on the stove and let it heat until it almost start boiling. When the inner walls of the pan were covered with little bubbles, throw a handful of salt in the water. If it were done at the right time, a LOT of bubbles will be produced when the salt were added, creating the impression that the water started to boil when one added the salt.

The same effect can be achieved throwing a spoonful of sugar (or salt, or any powder) in a cup of coke (or any other carbonated drink). "Mentos" (that mint) works as well as sugar.

This happens because the bubbles need a surface to grow on. Thats why there are bubbles on the inner walls of a cup of carbonated drinks, or of a pan of boiling water. The added salt (or sugar or mentos or whatever), being a powder, has a very large surface, and so allows the creation of a lot of bubbles, giving the impression the water (or coke) started to boil.
 
  • #30
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just helped my niece test her hypothesis that salt added to water would decrease the time needed to reach boiling (100 C) using a candy thermometer

she used the 2 cups of water and did 3 tests each with 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 tablespoons of salt

pot was identical, and was cooled to same starting temperature each time

she let the salt dissolve first, before initiating boiling. She found that the time to boiling point was nearly identical for 0 and 1 tablespoons, but the time to boiling decreased for each of the next sets of tests by about 1 to 1.5 minutes.

She is full of questions, and possible next steps

It is so nice to see her excited about it
 
  • #31
turbo
Gold Member
3,147
53
just helped my niece test her hypothesis that salt added to water would decrease the time needed to reach boiling (100 C) using a candy thermometer

she used the 2 cups of water and did 3 tests each with 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 tablespoons of salt

pot was identical, and was cooled to same starting temperature each time

she let the salt dissolve first, before initiating boiling. She found that the time to boiling point was nearly identical for 0 and 1 tablespoons, but the time to boiling decreased for each of the next sets of tests by about 1 to 1.5 minutes.

She is full of questions, and possible next steps

It is so nice to see her excited about it
It's nice to see that you are willing to explore the scientific method with her. Many adults are not so willing and go down the "everybody knows" route, which is counter-productive with kids. Kudos!
 

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