Saying Goodbye to My Old PC: Is Data Recovery Possible?

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In summary, your old PC died and you replaced it with a new one. The old PC had problems with the bootup process and you are wondering if it is possible to connect the old hard drive to the new one. You also want to backup some files before the new PC was installed. You are not able to connect the old hard drive to the new PC, but you can connect it to a different computer and access the files that are on it.
  • #1

enigma

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Well, my trusty PC finally bit it. I don't know if it was a virus or simply age that did it in.

I simply turned it on, and it stalls on the bootup splash before it checks for alternate startup CDs/floppys, and before you can access the bios.

I went out and dropped 1/3 of my summer income on a new one. 2.08GHz P4, 256MB +512MB chip (yet to be installed), 120GB Drive, etc.

Now what I'm wondering: Is there any way to plug into the old one's hard drive to pull some lost files off? I did a document backup before the start of the semester, and most of the code I've written is backed up on my Zip disk which I use to do work on the school labs. The rest I have hard copy printouts, so they can be re-entered. In short, there isn't anything which I'll die without. I still would like to pull the (bought and downloaded, so not re-installable) $30 Matlab controls system package, as well as some of my favorite saved games off of it if possible.

Any ideas, tech wizards?
 
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  • #2
It sounds to me like your problem didn't have anything to do with the harddrive. So you can simply set your old hard drive to slave and there you go. I'd do a disk check one hoocked up just to make sure though.
 
  • #3
If you set the old hard drive up as a slave (configure the jumpers) you should be able to read off it after booting into windows on the new drive (which would be set as master).
 
  • #4
I think I could probably figure that out. Would it be safe to operate the system with the box open and the slave hard drive hanging out the side, or does it need to be screwed in and grounded?

Will it make a difference that the old drive is over 5 years old, and the new PC is using XP (old op. sys. was win 98). I'm guessing the bus speeds are different as well.

Probably more importantly, if something did infect the old PC, is there any chance that it will 'jump' to the new drive before I run the virus scan software on it?
 
  • #5
Originally posted by enigma
I think I could probably figure that out. Would it be safe to operate the system with the box open and the slave hard drive hanging out the side, or does it need to be screwed in and grounded?

Will it make a difference that the old drive is over 5 years old, and the new PC is using XP (old op. sys. was win 98). I'm guessing the bus speeds are different as well.

Probably more importantly, if something did infect the old PC, is there any chance that it will 'jump' to the new drive before I run the virus scan software on it?

It can dangle temporarily.

The old OS does not make a difference since it will not be loaded. You will just see the file structure as if it were another partition to your new drive.

There is a chance the virus could spread, but your problems doesn't sound like a virus. Just a very common hardware (most likely memory or mobo malfunction).
 
  • #6
thanks!

Once I get everything up and running on the new PC, I'll be sure to pester you for instructions getting the slave set up! :wink:
 
  • #7
Originally posted by enigma
thanks!

Once I get everything up and running on the new PC, I'll be sure to pester you for instructions getting the slave set up! :wink:

ok! they instructions should be on the back of each hard drive. the jumper placement.
 

1. Can I recover data from my old PC even if it won't turn on?

Yes, it is possible to recover data from a non-functioning PC. In such cases, a professional data recovery service may be necessary to extract the data from the hard drive. However, if the hard drive is severely damaged, data recovery may not be possible.

2. How much does data recovery for an old PC usually cost?

The cost of data recovery varies depending on the severity of the damage to the PC and the amount of data that needs to be recovered. On average, data recovery for an old PC can cost anywhere from $100 to $1000. It is important to consult with a reputable data recovery service for an accurate quote.

3. Is it possible to recover data from a PC that has been formatted?

Yes, data recovery is possible even if a PC has been formatted. However, it is important to note that formatting erases all data on the hard drive, so the chances of recovering all data may be slim. It is best to consult with a data recovery specialist for the best course of action.

4. How long does it take to recover data from an old PC?

The time it takes to recover data from an old PC varies depending on the complexity of the recovery process and the amount of data that needs to be recovered. In some cases, data recovery can be completed within a few hours, while more complex cases may take several days.

5. Can I recover data from my old PC on my own?

It is not recommended to try to recover data from an old PC on your own, especially if it is not functioning properly. Attempting to recover data without the proper knowledge and tools can potentially cause further damage to the PC and make data recovery more difficult. It is best to seek professional help from a reputable data recovery service.

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